STVM '99


5th Biennial Conference
Society for Tropical Veterinary Medicine
Tropical Diseases: Control and 
Prevention in the Context of 
"The New World Order"


June 12-16  Key West, Florida


Background Music: Jimmy Buffett's hit single --
"Changes in Latitude, Changes in Attitude"


This conference has concluded -- the information is provided here
to assist you in planning for your attendance at future conferences.


INFORMATION FOR THE 2001 CONFERENCE:

Society for Tropical Veterinary Medicine 2001
                         (click the hyperlink above for the conference web site)
             - July 22-27, 2001 - Pilanesberg National Park, South Africa

The program agenda and abstracts from this conference are available below.  They are in Adobe PDF format, you need Adobe Acrobat Reader to open and print the PDF file. Available for free download.)

Abstracts from the Fifth Biennial Conference - Society for Tropical Veterinary Medicine



SITE INDEX
Introduction and Overview Poster Confirmation and Instructions Related Websites of Interest
Dedication of STVM '99 Conference Accompanying Guest Agenda Dry Tortugas Snorkeling Excursion
Program  Agenda Registration Information Key West & FL Keys Attractions
Poster Presentations Registration Forms / Membership Applications STVM Officers & Conference Organizers
Norval-Young Award Winners Hotel Accommodations For Further Information
Manuscript Instructions Airline Transportation

Introduction

STVM was first founded as the American Society for Tropical Veterinary Medicine in 1978. At the biennial meeting in 1993 in Guadeloupe the name of the Society was changed to the Society for Tropical Veterinary Medicine to reflect its international character. In May 1995 the first meeting was held in San Jose, Costa Rica, under the new name. 

The aim of the STVM is to promote the international advancement of tropical veterinary medicine, hygiene and related disciplines. Individuals with interests in any phase of tropical veterinary medicine are encouraged to apply for membership. The Society meets every two years in different locations. 

June weather in Key West will be hot and tropical. Informal dress will be appropriate throughout the conference, and all social functions with the exception of the poster session/ social will be held outdoors.

The keynote speakers are from international agencies and countries from around the world. The conference will address the direction of tropical veterinary medicine in the next century. So make plans to join us for a "change in latitude and a change in attitude" at STVM ’99!

See you in Key West!

Who Should Attend?

If you are one of the following with an interest in tropical and emerging diseases, plan now to attend. 
  • Veterinary and Medical Research Scientists
  • Epidemiologists and Information Specialists
  • Veterinarians and Physicians
  • Molecular and Wildlife Biologists
  • Vaccine and Pharmaceutical Manufacturers 
  • Immunologists and Pathologists
  • Public Health and Veterinary 
  • Regulatory Officials 
  • Economists and Disease Modelers

Opportunities for Interaction

The conference will provide numerous opportunities to discuss common concerns and up-to-date research on tropical and emerging diseases with colleagues from around the world. This information exchange is vital to the development of policy and implementation of prevention and control methods. We look forward to your participation.

Conference Theme 

The focus of the 1999 conference is Tropical Diseases: Control and Prevention in the Context of "The New World Order." The next century has been defined by the Economist magazine as a "dangerous century." It is impossible to define precisely the inter-relationships and implications of myriad changes associated with the "new world order" on the emergence and control of tropical diseases in the next century, but they cannot be ignored! Despite improved technology utilizing diagnostic tests and vaccines, the international movement of live animals and the complexity of food trading patterns is increasing the worldwide risk of emerging diseases for both animals and man. Animal pathogens continue to establish new niches and undergo genetic mutation. We invite you to join us for this in-depth conference on exploring the ever-changing face of tropical diseases.

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Conference Format

STVM ’99 will explore the “new world order” theme during symposia in the mornings and “break out” sessions by discipline in the afternoons. Topics may focus on epidemiology, global trade, vaccines and diagnostic technologies and their relationships to emerging diseases. 


Published Proceedings

All participants giving papers and/or presenting posters will be expected to submit a full manuscript at the time of the conference. Click here for manuscript guidelines for publication in English in a special issue of the Annals of New York Academy of Sciences.

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Dedication of STVM '99 Conference

Dr. Duncan Brown
Professor Duncan Brown  graduated from the University of Edinburgh in 1958 with a BVMS and MRCVS.  From 1958-1967, he served as a Veterinary Research Officer at the Wellcome Research Laboratory, Kabete, Kenya, and as a Cell and Tissue Culturist, FAO/LNDP Tick-borne Diseases Project, EAVRO, Muguga, Kenya.  From 1977-1983, Dr. Brown was a Senior Research Fellow and Head of the Theileriosis Research Project, Protozoology Section, Department of Tropical Animal Health, CTVM, University of Edinburgh after which he served as Head of the Protozoology Section of CTVM, University of Edinburgh from 1983-1990. From 1990-to present, Professor Brown had been the Programme Manager for the DFID/NRRD Animal Health Research Programme.

At present, Professor Brown leads a group of 14 research workers conducting investigations into two major groups of haemoprotozoal diseases of livestock in the tropics, tsetse and non-tsetse transmitted trypanosomiasis and tick-borne diseases, notably theileriosis (East Coast fever and tropical theileriosis).  Research funds for this work primarily come from the Department of International Development (DRID) of Her Majesty’s Government but, over the past 5 years research grants have been awarded by the Wellcome Trust and the EEC/EU (under STD I, II, III and INCO-DC of DG XII) for investigations conducted jointly with: Dr. Roger Hall, Department of Biology, University of York, Dr. Patricia Preston and colleagues, Institute of Cell, Animal and Population Biology, University of Edinburgh and Professor Andy Tait and colleagues, Wellcome Unit of Molecular Parasitology, University of Glasgow.

Since returning to Scotland after 19 years work on tick-borne diseases of cattle in East Africa, Professor  Brown has maintained active contact in the field or tick-borne diseases in the tropics, having twice stood on the Scientific Advisory Board of the International Laboratory for Research on Animal Disease (ILRAD, now ILRI, Nairobi, Kenya) and acted as a consultant to FAO in Malawi and India; IAEA in Kenya and India, ODA in Brazil, Bolivia, Paraguay, India, Malawi and Bangladesh; British Council in Morocco, Brazil and Turkey; and IFAD in Iraq.  The tick-borne diseases research team currently has active interrelationships with workers in Brazil, Morocco, Kenya, Malawi, Tunisia, Turkey and with 3 groups in the past 5 years, either alone or together with the U. K. based collaborators listed above, have been awarded 5 contracts for collaborative work on theileriosis and other tick-borne diseases with  institutes in  India, Turkey, Tunisia, Morocco and Kenya.  The last of these, a major “link” project with the Kenyan Agricultural Institute, has evaluated the impact made in controlling bovine theileriosis by vaccination, the  culmination of over 20 years work on the problem.

In the past 9 years management of ODA’s (now DFID) Natural Resources Research Division Animal Health Programme has involved considerable commitment of Dr. Brown’s time and energy.  This Programme, with an annual budget of approximately 2.4 million (1994/1995), funds strategic and adaptive projects at the CTVM subcontracted externally.  Due to the nature of targeting the work conducted in the Department of Tropical Animal Health CVTM) and particularly that contracted by ODA and the European Union, much published work is in the “grey” literature, effecting appropriate distribution information.  Examples of this can be seen in three recent EEC/ED publications where the impact made in particular target areas by CTVM staff is highlighted by papers presented at recent meetings of contractors.

Throughout his career, Professor  Brown has been a key researcher in the area of tick-borne disease worldwide. He as been a supporter of good research independent of the gender of the investigator. Professor  Brown has also been an enthusiastic supporter of STVM having attended and participated in most all of the STVM biennial meetings of which the first was held in 1991.  At STVM-97 held at Montpellier, France, Professor Brown  presented the key-note address which was educational as well as entertaining (see photo insert) as his words of wisdom were translated by the French interpreter.   He is well noted for his ability to combine profound scientific commentary with humor.

It is with great pleasure that we dedicate STVM-99 to you, Professor Duncan Brown, for your dedication to tropical veterinary medicine worldwide and contributions to the development of the Society for Tropical Veterinary Medicine.  We wish you a long, happy and active retirement.Lesley More and Katherine Kocan, June 1999


Professor Duncan Brown delivers
keynote address at STVM '97


Professor Brown pictured with:
(left to right)
Dr. Wendy Brown,
STVM President-elect;
Dr. Kathy Kocan, 
STVM Past-president;
and
Dr. Pat Conrad,
former graduate student of Prof. Brown

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Program Agenda

Agenda Index
  Friday, June 11, 1999
  Saturday, June 12, 1999
  Sunday, June 13, 1999
      *Opening Session
      *Symposium 1 - World Trade & Disease Control: Dynamics of Food Production and Populations
      *Symposium 2A - Epidemiology of Emerging Diseases: Microbiology
      *Symposium 2B - Epidemiology of Emerging Diseases: Parasitology
      *Concurrent General Session I: Contributed Papers
      *Concurrent General Session II: Contributed Papers
  Poster Presentations
  Monday, June 14, 1999
      *Symposium 3 - Bioterrorism and Its Prevention
      *Symposium 4 - Tools of Control and Prevention--I.Diagnostic Technology
      *Concurrent Minisymposium on Vesicular Stomatitis
      *Concurrent Minisymposium on Vaccines and Diagnostics for Tick-borne Diseases of Cattle
  Tuesday, June 15, 1999
      *Symposium 5 - Tools of Control and Prevention--I.Vaccines and Pharmaceuticals
      *Symposium 6 - Tools of Control and Prevention--II. Quarantine, Regulatory Control & Communication
      *Concurrent General Session III: Contributed Papers
      *Concurrent General Session IV: Contributed Papers
  Wednesday, June 16, 1999
      *Concurrent Minisymposium on Diagnostics: Techniques, Management, Validation, etc.
      *Concurrent Minisymposium on Present and Future Technologies for Tick Control
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Friday, June 11, 1999

AM
7:00 Dry Tortugas Snorkeling Excursion Participants Gather in Hotel Lobby to depart for Marina; (Breakfast and lunch provided on board the boat.)

PM
8:00 Return from Dry Tortugas Snorkeling Excursion
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Saturday, June 12, 1999

AM
10:00–7:00 Conference Registration Office Open
(Participants may register and collect conference materials.)

PM
1:00–7:00 Poster Hall Available for Set Up of Poster Displays
(A formal poster session is scheduled Sunday, June 13 from 6:00pm – 8:00pm)
7:00–9:00 Welcome Reception at Former U.S. President Harry S. Truman’s Little White House
Return to Agenda Index

Sunday, June 13, 1999
AM
7:00–5:30 Conference Registration Office Open
(Participants may register and collect conference materials.)
7:00–5:30 Poster Displays Available for Viewing
7:00–8:00 Continental Breakfast

Opening Session
8:00–8:10 General Assembly and Opening Remarks – Paul Gibbs, Conference Chair and President-elect of STVM
8:10-8:20 Conference Dedication to Dr. Duncan Brown 
8:20–8:30 Welcome Address – Leroy Coffman, State Veterinarian, Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services (FDACS), Tallahassee, FL (USA)
Welcome Address – Joan Arnoldi, Associate Administrator, Animal Plant Health Inspection Service, USDA, Washington, DC (USA)
8:30–8:50 Welcome Address – Norman Willis, President, International Organization for Animal Health, Office International des Epizooties (OIE) Winnipeg, Manitoba (Canada)
8:50–9:10 What and How do We Communicate? – Martin Hugh-Jones, Louisiana State University (USA)
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Sunday, June 13, 1999 (continued)
Symposium I – World Trade and Disease Control: Dynamics of Food Production and Populations
Chair: Norman Willis, International Organization for Animal Health (Canada)
9:10–9:30 Protect Health, Facilitate Trade, or Both? – Alex Thiermann, United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), Animal and Plant Inspection Services (APHIS) International Services (IS) (Belgium)
9:30–9:50 World Trade, Disease and Florida’s Animal Populations: The Changing Dynamics – Leroy M. Coffman, Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, Tallahassee, FL (USA)
9:50–10:10 International Trade: Multinational Aspects – Yoshihiro Ozawa, OIE Regional Representation, Tokyo, (Japan)
10:10–10:30 REFRESHMENT BREAK
10:30–10:50 The Impact of Diseases on the Importation of Animals and Animal Products – Tom Walton, USDA, APHIS Veterinary Services (USA)
 10:50–11:10 A Perspective on Animal Protein Production in Africa – Emmanuel Camus, Centre de Cooperation Interntionale en Recherche Agronomique pour le Developpment–Elevage et Medicine Veterinaire, CIRAD-EMVT (France)
11:10–11:30 OIE List A Diseases as a Constraint to International Trade – Paul Kitching, Institute for Animal Health (IAH)–World Reference Laboratory (WRL) (UK)
11:30–11:50 The Increasing Significance of International Trade in Equids and its Influence on the Spread of Equine Diseases – Peter Timoney,  Department of Veterinary Science, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky (USA)
11:50–12:00 Discussion

PM
12:00–1:00 LUNCH ON OWN
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Sunday, June 13, 1999 (continued)
Concurrent Symposium 2A–Epidemiology of Emerging Diseases: Microbiology
Chair: Paul Gibbs, University of Florida (USA)
1:00–1:20 Emerging Diseases of Australasia – Keith Murray, USDA Agricultural Research Service (ARS) (USA)
1:20–1:40 Emerging Diseases of the Americas: Moving Beyond Emergencies to Address Issues – Kevin Walker, Instituto Interamericano de Cooperaction para la Agricultura (IICA) (Costa Rica)
1:40–2:00 Emerging Diseases of Africa and the Middle East – Mark Rweyemamu, Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) (Italy)
2:00–2:20 Classical Swine Fever in Europe – Christopher M. Groocock, International Services, (IS) Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS), USDA, Vienna (Austria)
2:20–2:40 Contagious Bovine Pleuropneumonia in Africa: New Developments – Francois Thiaucourt, CIRAD-EMVT (France)
2:40–3:00 Discussion
3:00–3:30 REFRESHMENT BREAK
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Sunday, June 13, 1999 (continued)
Concurrent Symposium 2B–Epidemiology of Emerging Diseases: Parasitology
Chair: S. A. Ewing, Oklahoma State University (USA)
1:00–1:20 The Troublesome Tribe Ehrlichiae: Variations on an Evolutionary Theme – Basil A. Allsopp, Onderstepoort Veterinary Institute, Onderstepoort (South Africa)
1:20–1:40 Canine Hepatozoonosis: An Emerging Disease in the New World – S. A. Ewing, R. J. Panciera, J. S. Mathew, C. Cummings, and A. A. Kocan, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK (USA)
1:40–2:00 Neosporosis: Aspects of Epidemiology and Host Immune Response – Elisabeth A. Innes
Moredun Research Institute, Edinburgh (UK)
2:00–2:20 Cryptosporidiosis: A Global Challenge – Derek A. Mosier and Richard D. Oberst.
Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS (USA)
2:20–2:40 Emerging and Re-emerging Diseases of Livestock in Southern Africa – Jacobus A. W. Coetzer1 and Daniël T. De Waal2. 1Department of Veterinary Tropical Diseases, Faculty of Veterinary Science, University of Pretoria (South Africa); 2Onderstepoort Veterinary Institute, Onderstepoort (South Africa)
2:40–3:00 Discussion
3:00–3:30 REFRESHMENT BREAK
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Sunday, June 13, 1999 (continued)
Concurrent General Session I: Contributed Papers
Chair: Edmour F. Blouin, Oklahoma State University (USA)
3:30–3:45 Norval-Young Award Co-Winner Presentation:
Assessing infection risk by vectors: Spatial and temporal distribution of African ticks –Michel de Garine-Wichatitsky, CIRAD-EMVT, Montpellier (France)
3:45–4:00 Norval-Young Award Co-Winner Presentation:
An In Vivo Model to Investigate Lymphocyte-Mediated Immunity during Acute Hemoparasitic Infections: Use of a Monoclonal Antibody to Selectively Deplete CD4+ T Lymphocytes from Thymectomized Calves – Reginald A. Valdez1,2, Travis C. McGuire2, Wendy C. Brown2, William C. Davis2, Terry F. McElwain2, and Donald P. Knowles1,2. 1United States Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, Animal Disease Research Unit, Pullman, WA, (USA); 2Department of Veterinary Microbiology and Pathology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Washington State University, Pullman, WA (USA)
4:00–4:15 Analysis of a 6kb Cowdria ruminantium clone that protects against lethal Cowdria challenge – Kelly A. Brayton, Francina van Strijp and Basil A. Allsopp, Onderstepoort Veterinary Institute, Onderstepoort, Gauteng (South Africa)
4:15–4:30 Evaluating the potential for adoption of a new inactivated heartwater vaccine in livestock production systems of southern Africa – B. Minjauw, Tom Randolph, Brian Perry. ILRI-Kenya, Nairobi (Kenya)
4:30–4:45 Inhibition of Growth of Anaplasma marginale by 4-Bromophenacyl Bromide: An In Vitro Study – Edmour F. Blouin, Katherine M. Kocan, Jeremiah T. Saliki, Alan S. Bowman, and John R. Sauer. Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, Oklahoma (USA)
4:45–5:00 Ehrlichia chaffeensis in Domestic Goats: Field Survey and Experimental Infection –
Susan E. Little, Vivien G. Dugan, Ashley D. Beall, and David E. Stallknecht, University of Georgia, Athens, GA (USA)
5:00–5:15 The Effect of Borrelia burgdorferi Infection on the Cold Hardiness of Field Collected Ixodes scapularis – Jodi White1, Wayne A. Rowley1 and Kenneth B. Platt2; 1Iowa State University, Department of Entomology, Ames, Iowa; 2Iowa State University, College of Veterinary Medicine, Ames, Iowa (USA)
5:15-5:30 Discussion
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Sunday, June 13, 1999 (continued)
Concurrent General Session II: Contributed Papers
Chair: Peter J. Timoney, University of Kentucky (USA)
3:30–3:45 Activities of the OIE – Expert ad hoc Group on NTTAT: An Outline – Louis
Touratier, Secretary/Coordinator of the OIE ad hoc Group on NTTAT, Bordeaux (France)
3:45–4:00 The Epidemiology of Equine Influenza Virus and Equine Herpes Virus Infection in the (USA) from the Perspective of Vaccine Development – Mark Abdy1, Dorothy Gauntlett1, Miriam Ellis1, Mark Sweat1, David Bloom2, Norbert Klein3, Thomas Lengsfeld3, and Paul Gibbs1. 1University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (USA); 2Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ (USA); 3Hoechst Roussel Vet, Marburg (Germany)
4:00–4:15 Rapid Recovery and Identification of Anthrax Bacteria from the Environment – J. L. Kiel1, J. E. Parker1, J. L. Alls2, E. A. Holwitt3, and P. J. Morales1.1Air Force Research Laboratory, Brooks Air Force Base, TX, (USA); 2Veridian, Inc., San Antonio, TX (USA); 3Conceptual MindWorks, Inc., San Antonio, TX (USA)
4:15–4:30 Future Perspectives on Veterinary Hemoparasite Research on the Face of the Next Century – Roy D. Melendez. Universidad Centroccidental Lisandro Alvarado, Barquisimeto, Lara (Venezuela).
4:30–4:45 Ethnoveterinary medicine and indigenous pharmacopeia in central region of Burkina Faso: case of Passoré province – Hamidou Tamboura1, Henri Kaboré1, and Salfo M. Yaméogo2. 1Environmental and Agriculture Research Institute, Ouagadougou, (Burkina Faso) 2National School for Livestock and Animal Health, Ouagadougou (Burkina Faso)
4:45–5:00 Held Open for Late Breaking News of Disease Outbreaks Around the World.
5:00–5:30 Discussion
6:00–8:00 Poster Session and Social Gathering
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Sunday, June 13, 1999 (continued)
Poster Presentations (Listed alphabetically by presenting author.)
Poster Confirmation and Instructions
The Epidemiology of Equine Influenza Virus and Equine Herpes Virus Infection in the (USA) from the Perspective of Vaccine Development – Mark Abdy1, Dorothy Gauntlett1, Miriam Ellis1, Mark Sweat1, David Bloom2, Norbert Klein3, Thomas Lengsfeld3, and Paul Gibbs1. 1University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (USA); 2Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ (USA); 3Hoechst Roussel Vet, Marburg (Germany)

Generation of Cytotoxic T-lymphocytes and Cytostatic Acting Cells in T. annulata-immune Cattle – Jabbar S. Ahmed1, Horst Ritz2, Heike Hartwig2, and Eberhard Schein2. 1Forschungszentrum Borstel, Borstel, Germany; 2Institute for Parasitology and Tropical Veterinary Medicine, University of Berlin, Berlin (Germany)

Efficacy and Safety of New Adjuvants – J. Aucouturier1, V. Ganne1 and A. Laval2. 1SEPPIC 75 quai d’Orsay Paris (France); 2Ecole Nationale vétérinaire de Nantes

Cross-Reactivity between Instars of the Rhipicephalus sanguineus (Latreille, 1806) Tick in Guinea Pigs – Matias P. J. Szabó, E. C. A. Bertipaglia, G. H. Bechara. São Paulo State University, Jaboticabal, SP (Brazil)

Preliminary Results of a Larval Resistance Test to Ivermectins using Boophilus microplus Reference Strains – Efraín Benavides and Alvaro Romero; Programa Nacional de Epidemiología Veterinaria, Corporación Colombiana de Investigación Agropecuaria, CORPOICA-CEISA, Santafé de Bogotá (Colombia)

Attenuated Trivalent Vaccine against Babesiosis and Anaplasmosis in Colombia – Efraín Benavides1, Otoniel Vizcaino2, Claudia Britto1, Alvaro Romero1and Alfonso Rubio2. 1Programa Nacional de Epidemiología Veterinaria (EpiVet). Corporación Colombiana de Investigación Agropecuaria, CORPOICA-CEISA. Santafé de Bogotá, Colombia; 2 Laboratorios LIMOR de Colombia. Santafé de Bogotá (Colombia)

Comparative Risk Framework Methodology (CRFM) with Cryptosporidium/Disinfectant By-Products Case Study – Mary E.  Brown1, Brenda K. Boutin1, Robert Clark2, Josh Cohen3, Terry Harvey1, John C. Lipscomb1, Richard Miltner1, Patricia Murphy1, Linda R. Papa1, Richard Rheingans4, Glenn Rice1, and Linda Teuschler1. 1National Center for Environmental Assessment, U.S. EPA, Cincinnati, OH (USA); 2National Risk Management Research Laboratory U.S. EPA, Cincinnati, OH (USA); 3Gradient Corp. Boston, MA (USA); 4Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry, Atlanta, GA (USA).

Immunological Control of Ticks Through Vaccination with Boophilus microplus Gut Antigens – José de la Fuente and Manuel Rodríguez, Mammalian Cell Genetics Division, Centro de Ingeniería Genética y Biotecnología, Havana (Cuba)

Biological control of the vector of malaria in Escuintla, Guatemala – Sergio D. Blanco1, A. Martínez1, R. de la Vega1, Otto Rolando2 and Roberto Tello3. 1Laboratorios Biológicos Farmacéuticos (LABIOFAM), C. Habana (Cuba) 2Área Salud de Huehuetenango (Guatemala) 3Área Salud de Escuintla (Guatemala)

Evaluation of the MAP1b ELISA for the Diagnosis of Heartwater in South Africa – Daniël T. de Waal1, Olivier Matthee1, and F. Jongejan2. 1Parasitology Division, Onderstepoort Veterinary Institute, Onderstepoort (South Africa); 2Department of Parasitology and Tropical Veterinary Medicine, Utrecht University (The Netherlands)

Insecticide resistance studies in Blattella germanica (Dictyoptera:Blattellidae) from Cuba – Cristina Díaz1, E. Calvo1, M. Rodríguez1, J. Bisset1 and Mirtha Pérez2. 1Tropical Medicine Institute "Pedro Kourí", Ciudad Habana (Cuba) 2Unidad de Vigilancia y Lucha Antivectorial, Ciudad Habana (Cuba)

Ehrlichia-Like Inclusion Bodies in Mononuclear Cells in Dogs from Spain - Seronegative to E.Canis, E.Ewingii and E.Risticii – M.A. Tesouro1, J. Nunez-Torron2, A. Sainz3, M. Recuna2, I. Amusategui3, M. S. Chetty4, I. Kakoma5 1 Department of Veterinary Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Leon (Spain); 2 Torron Veterinary Clinic, Vigo, Pontevedra (Spain); 3Department of Animal Pathology II, College of Veterinary Medicine, University Complutense, Madrid (Spain); 4Hyderabad University, Hyderabad (India); 5 Department of Veterinary Pathobiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, IL (USA).

Serological Evidence of Exposure to Ehrlichia risticii in Dogs in Spain – Angel Sainz1, Chang-Hyun Kim2, Miguel A. Tesouro3, Richard Hansen2, Inmaculada Amusategui1, Hyun-Young Koo2, Ibulaimu Kakoma2. 1 Department of Animal Pathology II, College of Veterinary Medicine, University Complutense, Madrid (Spain); 2 Department of Veterinary Pathobiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (USA); 3 Department of Veterinary Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Leon (Spain).

The Genetic Basis of Emerging Antibiotic Resistance in Veterinary Pathogens – Margie D. Lee1 and John J. Maurer2. 1The Department of Medical Microbiology and Parasitology, 2 The Department of Avian Medicine, The University of Georgia, Athens, GA (USA)

Further Investigations into the Susceptibility to Ticks and Tick-borne Diseases in the Indigenous Trypanotolerant Bos indicus Cattle Breeds in Kenya, the Maasai Zebu and Orma Boran – E. K. Mwangi1, L. Munga1, J. M. Ndung'u1, M. J. Stear3, S. W. J. Reid3, G. Gettinby2 and M. Murray3. 1Kenya Trypanosomiasis Research Institute (KETRI), Kikuyu, Kenya; 2Department of Statistics and Modelling Science, University of Strathclyde, Livingstone Tower, Glasgow, Scotland; 3Department of Veterinary Clinical Studies, University of Glasgow Veterinary School, Bearsden, Glasgow, Scotland.

Association of Botulism and Tetanus as causative agents of an outbreak of bovine paraplegic mortality in the eastern plains of Colombia – Efraín Benavides, Diego Ortiz, Johanna Benavides. Programa Nacional de Epidemiología Veterinaria. Corporación Colombiana de Investigación Agropecuaria, CORPOICA-CEISA. Santafé de Bogotá (Colombia)

Genetic Grouping of Classical Swine Fever Virus by Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism of E2 gene – Sujira Parchariyanon, Wasana Pinyochon, Sadarat Damrongwatanopokin and Ken Inui; National Institute of Animal Health, Jatujak, Bangkok, (Thailand)

Immune Response of Naive Cattle to Successive Infestations of Boophilus microplus Ticks – Lygia M. F. Passos 1, Osvaldo Rossetti 2, Alicia Arese 2, Carlos Eddi 2, Jorge Caracostantogolo2 and Luis E. Samartino 2. 1Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); 2INTA - CICV y A Morón, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

Identification of Stage Specific Genes in Schistosoma mansoni – Élida M.L. Rabelo, and Sérgio D.J. Pena. Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Brazil 

Homologous and Heterologous Immune Reactions between Venezuelan Geographic Isolates of Anaplasma marginale – Catalina Rey V.1,  Pedro M. Aso2 and Alfredo Coronado3. 1Universidad Francisco de Miranda, Coro (Venezuela). 2Universidad Simón Bolívar, Caracas (Venezuela). 3Universidad Centro Occidental Lisandro Alvarado, Barquisimeto (Venezuela)

Improving Egg-Production in Two Indigenous Communities Through the Adaptation of Management Practices and Local Knowledge: The Results of Participative Research – Deborah Leal Rodrigues and Rossana Lok; CATIE/GTZ Agroforestry Project, Turrialba (Costa Rica)

Anaerobic Dog Bite-Wound Infection – Alfonso Rodríguez, Rosa Barbella, and Lynda Castañeda; José María Vargas Medical School, Faculty of Medicine, Central University of Venezuela, Caracas (Venezuela)

Isolation and Partial Characterisation of Montecitos Strain of Boophilus microplus (Canestrini, 1877) Multi-Resistant to Different Acaricides – Efraín Benavides, José L. Rodríguez and Alvaro Romero. Programa Nacional de Epidemiología Veterinaria. CORPOICA - CEISA.  Santafé de Bogotá, D. C. (Colombia)

Isolation and Morphological Characterization of Mosquito Spirochetes from a Lyme Disease Endemic Area – Yibayiri O. Sanogo1, Siegfried Reipert2, Jiøí Halouzka3, Zdenìk. Hubálek3, Miroslav Nìmec1, 1Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Brno (Czech Republic); 2Institute of Biochemistry and Molecular Cell Biology, Vienna Biocenter, Vienna (Austria); 3Laboratory of Medical Zoology, Institute of Vertebrate Biology, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Brno (Czech Republic)

Proliferation and Cytokine Profile of T. annulata-infected Ovine Lymphoblastoid Cell Lines – Leonhard Schnittger, Ursula Diemer, Kati Boguslawski and Jabbar S. Ahmed, Forschungszentrum Borstel, Borstel (Germany)

Safety-Testing of Needle-Free, Jet Injection Devices to Detect Contamination with Blood and Other Tissue Fluids – James M. Sweat1, Mark Abdy1, Bruce G. Weniger2, Robert Harrington3, Bernard Coyle3, Ram A. Abuknesha4, and E. Paul Gibbs1. 1University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (USA); 2Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA (USA); 3American Jet Injector Inc., Lansdale, PA (USA); 4King’s College, London (UK)

Trypanosoma vivax Prevalence and Plasmatic Progesterone (P4) Concentration in Pregnant Ewes Confinement in Aragua State, Venezuela – Noris Roa1, Claudio Fuenmayor1, Rita Tamasaukas2, Héctor Ruiz3, Margarita Cobo3, Lina Soler1, Ramón Ordoñez1, Alexis Rivas1 and Aixa Aguirre2. 1Instituto de Investigaciones Zootécnicas, CENIAP-FONAIAP. Maracay (Venezuela); 2Universidad Experimental Rómulo Gallegos. San Juan de los Morros. Guárico (Venezuela); Universidad Central de Venezuela. Facultad de Veterinaria y de Agronomía. Maracay (Venezuela)

Epidemiologic and Patho-Clinical Diagnosis of Trypanosoma vivax, Anaplasma marginale, Babesia bigemina and  Babesia bovis  in Bovine Farms of Venezuela – Rita Tamasaukas1, Héctor Ruiz2 , Noris Roa3, Aixa Aguirre1, Jesús Ron1, and Margarita Cobo4. 1LABIPRESAN, Universidad Rómulo Gallegos; 2Facultad de Ciencias Veterinarias-UCV, Maracay, (Venezuela); 3IIZ-CENIAP/FONAIAP, Maracay (Venezuela); 4Facultad de Agronomía-UCV, Maracay, (Venezuela)

Surveys of Semduramicin efficacy against avian coccidiosis in Venezuela – Rita Tamasaukas1, Hector Ruiz2, and Ricardo Marti3. 1Universidad Rómulo Gallegos, Laboratorio de Investigación y Prestación de Servicios en Sanidad Animal (LABIPRESAN). San Juan de los Morros, estado Guárico (Venezuela); 2Universidad Central de Venezuela, Facultad de Ciencias Veterinarias. Maracay, Estado Aragua (Venezuela); 3Pfizer S.A. Maracay, Estado Aragua (Venezuela)

Trypnews: the new bulletin scientific and technical on Hemoparasites – Rita Tamasaukas1, A. R. M. Dávila2, Sandra Vokaty3Marc Desquesnes4, Roy Melendez5, Hector Ruiz6, and Margarita Cobo7. 1LABIPRESAN, Universidad Rómulo Gallegos, San Juan de Los Morros, Guarico (Venezuela); 2DBBM, FIOCRUZ (Brasil); 3IICA (Barbados); 4CIRDES, Burkina Faso; 5UCLA, Barquisimeto (Venezuela); 6FCV-UCV, Maracay (Venezuela); 7FA-UCV, Maracay, Venezuela.

Red Meat Production and Meat Losses in Burkina Faso (1987-1997) – Hamidou H. Tamboura and Henri Kaboré. Envir. and Agric. Research Inst. Ouagadougou (Burkina Faso)

Canine Colonization and Transmission of Bordetella pertussis – Kenneth L. Belcher1, Darla J.Wise1 and Hugo P. Veit2. 1Concord College, Athens, WV (USA); 2Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA (USA)

Disease Transmission Between Human and Nonhuman Primates: Strategies for Prevention – Janette Wallis1, and D. Rick Lee2 , 1University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK (USA); 2The University of Texas, M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Bastrop, TX (USA)

Inhibition of Salmonella typhimurium in Chickens by a Microcin Producing Avian Escherichia coli Transformant – Richard E. Wooley, Penelope S. Gibbs, and Emmett B. Shotts, The University of Georgia, Athens, GA (USA)

Return to Agenda Index  / Return to Main Index

Monday, June 14, 1999

AM
7:00–5:30 Conference Registration Office Open
7:00–5:30 Poster Displays Available for Viewing
7:00–8:00 Continental Breakfast

Symposium 3–Bioterrorism and Its Prevention
Chair: David Franz, Southern Research Institute (USA)
8:00–8:20 Animal Disease Agents as Terrorist Weapons – David R. Franz, Southern Research Institute, Frederick, MD (USA)
8:20–8:40 A Swedish / European View of Bioterrorism – Gunnar Sandström, Defence Research Establishment, Umeå and Department of Infectious Diseases, University of Umeå (Sweden)
8:40–9:00 The Role of the FBI in Bioterrorism – Randall Murch, Federal Bureau of Investigations, Washington, D.C. (USA)
9:00–9:20 Responses to Bioterrorism Directed Against Animals – John L. Williams and Dan Sheesley, USDA, APHIS, Washington, DC (USA)
9:20–9:40 Mitigation of Bioterrorist Threats in the 21st Century – Linda Logan-Henfrey, USDA, ARS, Beltsville, MD (USA)
9:40–10:00 Discussion
10:00–10:20 REFRESHMENT BREAK
Return to Agenda Index

Monday, June 14, 1999 (continued)
Symposium 4–Tools of Control and Prevention–I. Diagnostic Technology
Chair: Jeremiah Saliki, Oklahoma State University (USA)
10:20–10:40 The Role of Diagnostic Laboratories in Disease Control – Jeremiah Saliki, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK (USA)
10:40–11:00 Quality Control – International Implications on Diagnostic LaboratorieHarvey Westbury, Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization (Australia)
11:00–11:20 The Role of the World Reference Laboratories for Foot-and-Mouth Disease and for Rinderpest – R. P. Kitching, Institute for Animal Health, Surrey (United Kingdom)
11:20–11:40 Molecular Diagnostic Tools and Their Use in the Diagnosis of Persistent Parasitic Infections – Donald P. Knowles, Animal Disease Research Unit, ARS-USDA and Department of Veterinary Microbiology and Pathology, Washington State University, Pullman, WA (USA)
11:40–12:00 Molecular Approaches to Latency and Persistence and their Relevance to International Movement of Animals – David C. Bloom, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ (USA)

PM
12:00–1:00 LUNCH ON OWN
Return to Agenda Index

Monday, June 14, 1999 (continued)
Concurrent Minisymposium on Vesicular Stomatitis
Chair: Luis Rodriguez, USDA, Agricultural Research Service (USA)
1:00–1:20 Vesicular Stomatitis Outbreaks in the Southwestern United States: 1995-1998 – Brian McCluskey, Elizabeth Mumford, Josie Traub-Dargatz and Mo Salman, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO (USA)
1:20–1:40 Epidemiology of Vesicular Stomatitis Virus in Horses in the Southwestern United States: Preliminary Results of the Sentinel Herd Study – Elizabeth Mumford, Brian McCluskey, Josie Traub-Dargatz and Mo Salman, Colorado State University, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Fort Collins, CO (USA)
1:40–2:00 Genetic and Epidemiological Evidence Indicates that Vesicular Stomatitis Viruses are not Endemic in Northern Mexico and Southwestern (USA) – Luis L. Rodriguez, Plum Island Animal Disease Center, ARS-USDA, Greenport, New York (USA)
2:00–2:20 Current Epidemiological Studies on Vesicular Stomatitis in Costa Rica – Lukas Remmers1, Ana E. Jiménez2, Flor Vargas2, Rocio Cortes1, Rodolfo Pereira1,Luis Eduardo Forero1, Enrique Pérez2, Mo Salaman3 and Marco V. Herrero2. 1Agricultural University of Wagennigen (Netherlands); 2School of Veterinary Medicene, Universidad Nacional (Costa Rica); 3Colorado State University, Colorado (USA)
2:20–2:40 VSV-NJ on Ossabaw Island, Georgia: The Truth is Out There – David E. Stallknecht. Southeastern Cooperative Wildlife Disease Study, College of Veterinary Medicine, The University of Georgia, Athens, GA (USA)
2:40–3:00 Vector Competence of Wild and Colonized Black Flies to the Indiana and New Jersey Serotypes of Vesicular Stomatitis Virus – D.G. Mead and C. John Maré, Department of Veterinary Science and Microbiology, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (USA)
3:00–3:30 REFRESHMENT BREAK
3:30–3:50 Pharmacological Factors in the Saliva of Blood-feeding Insects: Implications for Vesicular Stomatitis Virus Epidemiology – Walter J. Tabachnick, USDA, ARS, Arthropod-borne Animal Diseases Research Laboratory, Laramie, WY (USA)
3:50–4:10 Haematophagous Flies and Small Rodents Occurring in a Vesicular Stomatitis Endemic Area in Costa Rica – Flor Vargas1, Ana E. Jiménez1, Rocio Cortes1, Rodolfo Pereira1, Sergio Cuadra1, Mo Salaman 2 and Marco V. Herrero1. 1School of Veterinary Medicine, Universidad Nacional, Heredia (Costa Rica) 2Department of Environmental Health, College of Veterinary Medicine, Colorado State University, Colorado (USA)
4:10–4:30 Experimental Infection of the Deer Mouse (Peromyscusmaniculatus) with Vesicular Stomatitis Virus – Todd E. Cornish, David E. Stallknecht, and Elizabeth W. Howerth, University of Georgia, Athens, GA (USA)
4:30–4:50 Vesicular Stomatitis Vaccines – James A. House1, Philippe Dubourget2, Michel Lombard2 and Carol House1. 1USDA, APHIS VS NVSL FADDL retired; 2Merial Animal Health Lyons (France)
4:50–5:00 Discussion
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Monday, June 14, 1999 (continued)
Concurrent Minisymposium on Vaccines and Diagnostics for Tick-borne Diseases of Cattle
Chair: Varda Shkap, Kimron Veterinary Institute (Israel)
1:00–1:20 Vaccines against bovine pathogenic theileriosis caused by Theileria parva infection – Subhash P. Morzaria, Vish Nene, Richard Bishop, and Tony Musoke, International Livestock Research Institute, Nairobi (Kenya)
1:20–1:40 Anaplasmosis control and diagnosis in South Africa – Daniël T. De Waal, Onderstepoort Veterinary Institute, Onderstepoort (South Africa)
1:40–2:00 Immunization against Tropical Theileriosis – V. Shkap and E. Pipano, Kimron Veterinary Institute, Bet Dagan (Israel)
2:00–2:20 Strategies for Designing T Helper Cell-targeted Vaccines against Bovine Babesia – Wendy C. Brown1, Lisl K.M. Shoda1, Barbara J. Ruef2, Allison C. Rice-Ficht2, Carlos E. Suarez1, Terry F. McElwain1, and Guy H. Palmer1. 1Program in Vector-borne Diseases, Washington State University, Pullman, WA (USA); 2Texas A and M University, College Station, TX (USA)
2:20–2:40 Anaplasmosis Control: Past, Present and Future – Katherine M. Kocan,1 Edmour F. Blouin1 and Anthony F. Barbet2. 1Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK (USA); 2University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (USA)
 2:40–3:00 Babesiosis Stability in Unstable Environments – Ronald D. Smith1, David E. Evans2, João R. Martins3, Victor H. Ceresér3, Bartolomeu L. Correa3, Carlos Petraccia4, Herculano Cardozo4, Maria Angelica Solari4 and Armando Nari4; 1University of Illinois, Urbana, IL (USA); 2Universidade Federal Rural do Rio de Janeiro, Itaguaí, RJ, (Brazil); 3Instituto de Pesquisas Veterinárias "Desidério Finamor", Porto Alegre, RS, (Brazil); 4Direccion de Laboratorios Veterinarios (DILAVE) "Miguel Rubino", Montevideo (Uruguay)
3:00–3:30 REFRESHMENT BREAK
3:30–3:50 Vaccination Against Cowdriosis – Emmanuel Camus and Dominique Martinez, CIRAD-EMVT, Guadeloupe (French West Indies)
3:50–4:10 Characterization of Attenuated Theileria annulata Vaccines from Spain and the Sudan – Marc-Jan Gubbels1, Javier Viseras2, Miguel A. Habela3, and Frans Jongejan1. 1Division of Parasitology and Tropical Veterinary Medicine, Utrecht University, Utrecht (The Netherlands); 2University of Granada, Granada (Spain); 3University of Extremadura, Cáceres (Spain)
4:10–4:30 Integrated Molecular Diagnosis of Theileria and Babesiaspecies of cattle in Italy – Olivier A. E. Sparagano1, Marc-Jan Gubbels1, Guido R. Loria2, Alexander P. de Vos1, Santo Caracappa2 and Frans Jongejan1. 1Division of Parasitology and Tropical Veterinary Medicine, Utrecht University, Utrecht (The Netherlands); 2Istituto Zooprofilattico Sperimentale della Sicilia, Palermo (Italy)
4:30–4:50 Vaccination against Bovine Babesiosis – Albertus J. de Vos, MedVet (Parasit), Tick Fever Research Centre, Department of Primary Industries, Wacol, Queensland (Australia)
4:50–5:00 Discussion
6:30 Social Hour on the Pier with Light Snacks and Cash Bar
-----
EVENING AND DINNER ON OWN
Return to Agenda Index

Tuesday, June 15, 1999
 
 
7:00–5:30 Conference Registration Office Open
7:00–8:00 Continental Breakfast
7:00–3:00 Poster Displays Available for Viewing
3:00–3:30 Poster Display Removal – (All presenters must remove their poster displays by 3:30pm.)
- This may be accomplished during the Tuesday afternoon Refreshment Break -

Symposium 5–Tools of Control and Prevention–II. Vaccines and Pharmaceuticals
AM
Chair: Norman Cheville, Iowa State University (USA)
8:00–8:20 Vaccines for the Control and Prevention of Exotic Diseases – Michel F. Lombard, Michel Proteau, Philippe Dubourget, MERIAL SA, Lyon (France)
8:20–8:40 New Brucellosis Vaccines for Cattle – Norman F. Cheville, Iowa State University, Ames, IA (USA)
8:40–9:00 Culture-Derived Parasites in Vaccination of Cattle Against Tick-Borne Diseases – Varda Shkap, and Eugene Pipano, Kimron Veterinary Institute, Bet Dagan (Israel)
9:00–9:20 Biocontrol of Ticks – Michael Samish, Kimron Veterinary Institute (Israel)
9:20–9:40 Discussion
9:40–10:10 REFRESHMENT BREAK
Return to Agenda Index

Tuesday, June 15, 1999 (continued)
Symposium 6–Tools of Control and Prevention–III. Quarantine, Regulatory Control and Communication
 
Chair: Bob Bokma, USDA, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (USA)
10:10–10:30 Eradication and Surveillance of the Tropical Bont Tick in the Caribbean: An International Approach – Rupert G. Pegram, Jorgen W. Hansen and D. David Wilson, Caribbean Amblyomma Programme, Bridgetown, Barbados; FAO, Rome (Italy) and USDA, Maryland, (USA)
10:30–10:50 Screwworm Eradication in the Americas – John H. Wyss, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Panama City (Panama)
10:50–11:10 International Approach to Eradication and Surveillance for Foot-and-Mouth Disease in the Americas – José G. Rodriguez-Torres, Director, Pan American Foot-and-Mouth Disease Center, PAHO/WHO (Brazil)
11:10–11:30 Animal Trypanosomiasis in South America: Current Status, Partnership and Information Technology – Alberto M. R. Dávila1 and Roberto Aguilar M. S. Silva2. 1Instituto Oswaldo Cruz, FIOCRUZ, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil; 2Embrapa/CNPSA, Concordia, Santa Catarina (Brazil)
11:30–11:50 An International Approach to Laboratory Diagnosis of Animal Diseases – Martyn H. Jeggo, Joint FAO/IAEA Division, International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria)

PM
11:50–12:00 Discussion
12:00–1:30 LUNCH ON OWN
Return to Agenda Index

Tuesday, June 15, 1999 (continued)
Concurrent General Session III: Contributed Papers
Chair: Banie Penzhorn, University of Pretoria (South Africa)
1:30–1:45 The epidemiology of Theileria parva infections on small holder dairy farms in Kenya – G. K. Gitau1, 2, J. J. McDermott1, B. D. Perry1, J. M. Katende1 and R.N. Brown3; International Livestock Research Institute, Nairobi (Kenya); 2Department of Clinical Studies, University of Nairobi, Nairobi (Kenya); 3Department of Pathology, Microbiology and Immunology, University of California, Davis, California (USA)
1:45–2:00 Preliminary Biological and Molecular Characterization of a Putative New Species of Theileria Infective for Small Ruminant – Yin Hong1, Luo Jianxun1, Zhang Qicai1, Guan Guiquan1, L. Schnittger2, J Ahmed2 and Lu Wenshun1. 1Lanzhou Veterinary Research Institute, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Lanzhou (China); 2 Forschungszentrum Borstel, Borstel (Germany)
2:00–2:15 Ribosomal small subunit RNA sequence analysis of Theileria lestoquardi and a Theileria species highly pathogenic for small ruminants in China – Leonhard Schnittger1, Yin Hong2, Luo Jianxun2, Anja Voss-Holtmann1 and J. S. Ahmed1. 1Forschungszentrum Borstel, Borstel (Germany); 2Lanzhou Veterinary Research Institute, Lanzhou, Gansu (People`s Republic of China)
2:15–2:30 Transplacental transmission of Babesia (Theileria?) equi in horses: the rule rather than the exception? – Brychan Lewis1, Banie Penzhorn1 and Paula Allsopp2. 1Faculty of Veterinary Science, University of Pretoria (South Africa); 2Onderstepoort Veterinary Institute (South Africa)
2:30–2:45 Babesia bovis Immunity: The Role of IFN-g, IL-4 and IL-10 in the Immunoregulation of iNOS – Will L. Goff, W. Carl Johnson, MS, and Paul A. Lacy, Animal Disease Research Unit, USDA-ARS, Pullman, WA (USA)
2:45–3:00 Lymphocyte Stimulatory Capacity of T. annulata-infected Ovine Lymphoblastoid Cells – Jabbar S. Ahmed1, Christiane Hollmann1, Ursula Diemer1, Anja Voss-Holtmann1, Eberhard Schein2, and Leonhard Schnittger1. 1Forschungszentrum Borstel, Borstel (Germany) 2Institute for Parasitology und Tropical Veterinary Medicine, University of Berlin, Berlin (Germany)
3:00–3:30 REFRESHMENT BREAK
3:30–3:45 Humoral Immune Response in Dogs Previously Immunized with Salivary Gland, Midgut or Repeated Infestations with Rhipicephalus sanguineus – Sathaporn Jittapalapong1, Roger W. Stich1, John C. Gordon1, Catherine A. Bremer1, and Omar O. Barriga2. 1 Department of Veterinary Preventive Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (USA); 2Instituto de Ciencias Biomedicas Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de Chile, Santiago (Chile)
3:45–4:00 Preliminary Studies on the Seasonal Activity of Ticks Associated with Wild Animals in the Nhecolandia Pantanal, Brazil – Gervásio H. Bechara1, M. P. J. Szabó1, J. M. B. Duarte1, Eliana R. Matushima2, Marcelo C. Pereira2, Yigal Rechav3, James E. Keirans4 and Laura J. Fielden5. 1São Paulo State University, Jaboticabal, (Brazil); 2São Paulo University, São Paulo (Brazil); 3Center for Diseases Control, Atlanta, GA (USA); 4Georgia Southern University, Statesboro, GA (USA); 5Berry College, Mount Berry, GA (USA)
4:00–4:15 Thermal Constant Estimation in Tropical Horse Tick – Rafael de la Vega1 and Graciella Díaz2. 1Laboratorios Biologicos Farmaceúticos (LABIOFAM), C. Habana (Cuba); 2Facultad de Biología, Universidad de la Habana (Cuba)
4:15–4:30 Pathogenicity of Entomopathogenic Nematodes to African Tick Species – Godwin P. Kaaya1, Michael Samish2, and Itamar Glazer3. 1International Centre of Insect Physiology and Ecology (ICIPE), Nairobi (Kenya); 2Kimron Veterinary Institute, Bet Dagan (Israel) 3The Volcani Center, ARO, Bet Dagan (Israel)
4:30–4:45 Larval Survival of the Tropical Horse Tick in Simulated Conditions – Graciella Díaz1 and Rafael de la Vega2. 1Facultad de Biología, Universidad de la Habana (Cuba) 2Laboratorios Biológicos Farmacéuticos (LABIOFAM), C. Habana (Cuba)
4:45–5:00 Artificial Feeding in Ticks through Micropippetes – Rafael de la Vega1, L. Finlay1 and Graciella Díaz2. 1Laboratorios Biologicos Farmaceúticos (LABIOFAM), C. Habana (Cuba); 2Facultad de Biología, Universidad de la Habana (Cuba)
5:00–5:15 Eradication of the Tropical Bont Tick…The St. Kitts Experience – Keith Phillip, Ministry of Agriculture (St. Kitts)
Return to Agenda Index

Tuesday, June 15, 1999 (continued)
Concurrent General Session IV: Contributed Papers
Chair: Roger Windsor, Scottish Agriculture College, Dumfries (UK)
1:30–1:45 The eradication of contagious bovine pleuropneumonia from south western Africa – Roger S. Windsor, Scottish Agriculture College, Dumfries (UK)
1:45–2:00 The Eradication of Contagious Bovine Pleuropneumonia from Botswana and its Socio-Economic Impacts at the Community Level – Gary R. Mullins1, B. Fidzani2, and Metseyabagale Kolanyane2. 1Veterinary Epidemiology and Economics Section, Ministry of Agriculture, Gaborone (Botswana); 2Monitoring and Evaluation Unit, Ministry of Agriculture, Gaborone (Botswana); 3Veterinary Epidemiology and Economics Section, Ministryof Agriculture, Gaborone (Botswana)
2:00–2:15 Mammalian Reservoirs and Epidemiology of Rabies in Human Beings in the United States, 1981-1998 – John W. Krebs, Jean S. Smith, Charles E. Rupprecht, and James E. Childs, Viral and Rickettsial Zoonoses Branch, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA (USA)
 2:15–2:30 Conservation Medicine – Sharon L. Deem1, Annelisa Kilbourn2, Nathan D. Wolfe3, Robert A. Cook1, and William B. Karesh1; 1Field Veterinary Program, Wildlife Conservation Society, Bronx, NY (USA); 2Lincoln Park Zoo, Chicago, IL (USA); 3Johns Hopkins School of Hygiene and Public Health, Baltimore, MD (USA)
2:30–2:45 Detection of Mucosally Delivered Antibody to Cryptosporidium parvum p23 in Infected Calves – Carol R. Wyatt1, and Lance E. Perryman2; 1Washington State University, Pullman, WA (USA) 2North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC (USA)
2:45–3:00 Antibiotic resistance among Salmonella isolated from humans and slaughter animals in Kampala district, Uganda – G. W. Nasinyama1, S. A. McEwen2, D. Waltner-Toews2, C. L. Gyles3, J. Wilson2, J. Opuda-Asibo1 and C. Poppe4. 1Department of Veterinary Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Makerere University, Kampala (Uganda); 2Department of Population Medicine, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario (Canada); 3Department of Pathobiology, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario (Canada); 4 Health of Animals Laboratory, Health Canada, Guelph, Ontario (Canada)
3:00–3:30 REFRESHMENT BREAK
3:30–3:45 Gene regulation: RNA stability modulates expression of surface glycoprotein GP46 during development of Leishmania chagasi promastigotesCJeffrey K. Beetham1, Karen S. Myung2, Tun-Ping Yu1, Mary E. Wilson2, and John E. Donelson2. 1Iowa State University, Ames, IA (USA); 2University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (USA)
3:45–4:00 A Study on the Time of Ovicidal Effect of Some Anthelmintics in Djallonke Sheep and It’s Implications for the Control of Parasitic Helminth Infections – Dr. A.D. Agyei, Animal Research Institute (CSIR), Achimota (Ghana)
4:00–4:15 Standardization of the Diagnostic Criteria for Canine Ehrlichiosis: Towards an International Case Definition – Ibulaimu Kakoma1, Jane Biggerstaff2, Angel Sainz3, I. Amusategui3, and M. A.Tessouro3. 1University of Illinois, Urbana, IL (USA); 2JVC, Laredo TX (USA); 3Universidad Computense, Madrid (Spain)
4:15–4:30 Ten Years Research Activities on Tropical Parasitology of Dromedaries, Cattle, and Small ruminants in Mauritania – 
M. L. Dia, P. Jacquiet, J. Y. Chollet, C. Diop, A. Thiam, M. Aminetou and C. B.O Salem. Laboratoire de Parasitologie. Centre National d'Elevage et de Recherches Vétérinaires (CNERV), Nouakchott (Mauritanie)
4:30–4:45 The Status of Camel Trypanosomosis in Kenya – Njiru, Z. Kithinji, M. Phil, Ouma, J. Odera, M.phil, Ndung’u, J. Mathu, Kenya Trypanosomiasis Research Institute, Kikuyu (Kenya)
4:45–5:15 Discussion
7:00–10:00 Sunset Dinner Buffet on the Pier
Return to Agenda Index

Wednesday, June 16, 1999
AM
 
7:30–9:30 Business Meeting and Served Sit-down Breakfast

Concurrent Minisymposium on Diagnostics: Techniques, Management, Validation, etc.
Chair: James House, USDA, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (Retired) (USA)
9:30–9:45 Comparison Between c-ELISA and the CFT in Detecting Antibodies to Mycoplasma mycoides mycoides biotype SC in Cattle Affected by Contagious Bovine Pleuropneumonia in Botswana – W. Amanfu,S. Sediadie, K. V. Masupu, M. V. Raborokgwe, A. Benkirane, R. Geiger and F. Thiaucourt
9:45–10:00 Evaluation of a New Sandwich ELISA kit that uses Serum for Detection of Cattle Persistently Infected with BVD Virus – Jeremiah T. Saliki1, Roy Huchzermeier2, Hana Van Campen3 and Edward J. Dubovi4. 1Oklahoma Anim. Dis. Diag. Lab., Oklahoma State Univ., Stillwater, OK (USA); 2Syracuse Bioanalytical, Ithaca, NY (USA); 3Wyoming State Veterinary Lab., University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY (USA); 4Diagnostic Laboratory, NYSCVM, Cornell University, NY (USA)
10:00–10:15 Further validation of fixed-cell immunoperoxidase test (IPT) for antibodies to transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV) and porcine respiratory coronavirus cells (PRCV) – Thanh L. To1, Serge Bernard2 and Jean-Marie Aynaud2. 1National Institute of Veterinary Research, Hanoi (Vietnam); 2Laboratoire de Pathologie Infectieuse et; d’Immunologie, INRA, Tours (France)
 10:15–10:30 The Challenge of Diagnosing Diseases When Their Prevalence Approaches Zero – Thomas St. C. McKenna, Juan Lubroth, Mary Lou Berninger, and Carol House. USDA, APHIS, VS, National Veterinary Services Laboratories, Foreign Animal Disease Diagnostic Laboratory, Plum Island, NY (USA)
10:30–10:45 Development of A Molecular Probe to Baboon Interleukin-10 mRNA for InSitu Hybridization during Experimental Schistosomiasis – Tien-min Chou1, Roger W. Stich2, Melissa Scott1, Corrie C. Brown1, and Raymond T. Damian1. 1University of Georgia, Athens, GA (USA); 2Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (USA)
 10:45–11:00 Classical Swine Fever (CSF) Surveillance of Puerto Rico’s Mona Island – Linn Andrews, USDA, APHIS, VS, Aguadilla (PR)
11:00–11:15 Infectious Blindness in Macropods, Particularly Kangaroos – Harvey Westbury, CSIRO, Animal Health, Geelong, Australia Harvey Westbury, CSIRO; Animal Health, Geelong (Australia)
11:15–11:30 Emerging "Megamyxoviruses" Hendra and Nipah – Harvey Westbury, CSIRO, Animal Health, Geelong, Australia Harvey Westbury, CSIRO; Animal Health, Geelong (Australia)
11:30–12:00 Discusssion
12:00–12:15 General Assembly and Closing Remarks
12:15 Conference Concludes
Return to Agenda Index

Wednesday, June 16, 1999 (continued)
Concurrent Minisymposium on Present and Future Technologies for Tick Control
AM
Chair: Michael Samish, Kimron Veterinary Institute (Israel)
9:30–9:45 Past and Present National Tick Control Programs; Why they Succeed or Fail? – Rupert G. Pegram1, D. David Wilson2 and Jorgen W Hansen3. 1Caribbean Amblyomma Programme, Bridgetown (Barbados); 2USDA, Maryland (USA); 3FAO, Rome (Italy)
9:45–10:00 Trials to Control South American Ticks with Entomopathogenic Fungi – Vânia R. E. P. Bittencourt, Universidade Federal Rural do Rio de Janeiro, Seropédica, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)
10:00–10:15 Laboratory and Field Evaluation of Entomopathogenic Fungi For Tick Control –Godwin P. Kaaya, International Centre of Insect Physiology and Ecology (ICIPE), Nairobi (Kenya)
10:15–10:30 The Influence of Grooming on Tick Populations and Its Potential Use in Tick Control – Benjamin L. Hart, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis (USA)
10:30–10:45 Skin Test and Tick-Immune Status in Susceptible and Resistant Cattle in Brazil – Gervásio H. Bechara, J. Morelli Junior, M. P. J. Szabó. São Paulo State University, Jaboticabal, SP (Brazil)
10:45–11:00 Anti-tick Grasses as A Component of Integrated Tick Management Strategy – Godwin P. Kaaya, International Centre of Insect Physiology and Ecology (ICIPE), Nairobi (Kenya)
11:00–11:15 Can Entomopathogenic Nematodes Be Used for the Control of Ticks? – Michael Samish1, Alekseev Evgeny1 and Glazer Itamar2. 1Kimron Veterinary Institute, Bet Dagan (Israel); 2ARO, The Volcani Center, Bet Dagan (Israel)
11:15–11:30 Present and Future Technologies for Tick Control – John E. George, U.S. Livestock Insects Research Laboratory, USDA-ARS, Kerrville, TX (USA)
11:30–11:45 The Future of Anti-Tick Compounds – Jean-François Graf, Novartis Animal Health Inc., Basel (Switzerland)
11:45-12:00 Discussion
12:00 – 12:15 General Assembly and Closing Remarks
12:15 Conference Concludes
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Norval-Young Award Winners

Michel de Garine-Wichatitsky, DVM, MSc

Presenting: Sunday, June 13, 1999, 3:30pm–3:45pm

Assessing infection risk by vectors: Spatial and temporal distribution of African ticks –Michel de Garine-Wichatitsky1,2.1CIRAD-EMVT, Montpellier (France); 2CNRS/IRD Montpellier, France

Control of some major stock diseases in the tropics, such as theileriosis or trypanosomosis, is still largely based on the control of their vectors. Understanding the distribution of vectors, such as ticks and tsetse flies, is needed in order to improve the efficiency and economical viability of control operations. Technical improvements such as remote sensing and GIS allowed spectacular improvements, but the scale at which these predictions are made is still coarse. Indeed, trying to make these predictions at a lower scale is facing new challenges, and an analysis of host-vectors interactions with an evolutionary point of view is useful.

A study was undertaken on a mixed game/cattle ranch of Zimbabwe during which we monitored the variations in the abundance and the spatial distribution of the immature free stages of Rhipicephalus appendiculatus/ R. zambeziensis and R. e. evertsi, two major groups of tick species in Southern Africa. We found two contrasted distributions in relation to contact between tick larvae and ungulate-hosts : R. e. evertsi appeared to be unpredictable whereas R. appendiculatus/R. zambeziensis are predictable in time and space but associated with key-resources for ungulates (water and key forage resources). The consequences of such distributions are discussed in terms of vector control.

WINNER'S BIOGRAPHY: Michel de Garine-Wichatitsky obtained his degree from the School of Veterinary Medecine of Maisons-Alfort (Ecole Vétérinaire d’Alfort, France) in 1992. During the course of his studies (2nd and 4th years practicals) he worked on ectoparasites of Groupers in the Caribbean under the supervision of Dr K. Sullivan from the University of Miami. The results of his work have been used in his thesis for the Docorate in Veterinary Medecine which he obtained with Honors in 1995 (Prix de Thèse, Lauréat de la Faculté de Médecine de Créteil). In 1993 and 1994, he specialized in Tropical Animal Health and Production (DESS de Productions Animales en Régions Chaudes and CES Pathologie Tropicale, CIRAD-EMVT/ENVA/MNHN) and did his fieldwork in Zimbabwe on the ecological interactions between wild and domestic ungulates (Projet Ecologie Comparée, CIRAD/ARDA/CNRS). In addition, he completed a degree in ecology in 1995 with the University of Montpellier II (DEA Evolution et Ecologie, eq. MSc). Between 1995 and 1998 he was in charge of the Wild and Domestic Compared Ecology project and was based in CIRAD laboratory in Harare (Zimbabwe). Michel is currently doing a Ph.D in Montpellier on the spatial and temporal distribution of ticks in relation to ungulates’ infestations in a mixed game/cattle ranch of Zimbabwe, under the supervision of Dr F. Renaud and Pr G. Uilenberg. He has also been involved in several projects concerning environmental impact assessment of tsetse control operations and wildlife management in Southern Africa.

Reginald A. Valdez, DVM, MS

Presenting: Sunday, June 13, 1999, 3:45pm–4:00pm

An In Vivo Model to Investigate Lymphocyte-Mediated Immunity during Acute Hemoparasitic Infections: Use of a Monoclonal Antibody to Selectively Deplete CD4+ T Lymphocytes from Thymectomized Calves – Reginald A. Valdez1,2, Travis C. McGuire2, Wendy C. Brown2, William C. Davis2, Terry F. McElwain2, and Donald P. Knowles1,2. 1United States Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, Animal Disease Research Unit, Pullman, WA, (USA); 2Department of Veterinary Microbiology and Pathology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Washington State University, Pullman, WA (USA)

Thymectomized calves were selectively depleted of CD4+ T lymphocytes with a mAb (ILA-11; IgG2a) specific for the bovine CD4 monomer. Calves were treated with doses ranging from 270-540 mg of ILA-11 during week 1 of the study then treated with 30 mg doses administered twice weekly for 60 days. Depletion of CD4+ T lymphocytes was assessed weekly by flow cytometric analysis of PBMC and mononuclear cells from lymph node and spleen biopsies. Depletion of CD4+ T lymphocytes was > 98%, 96% and 93% in the peripheral blood, peripheral lymph nodes and spleen, respectively, by day 7. Although CD4+ T lymphocytes slowly returned to the peripheral blood, lymph nodes and spleen by day 14, the numbers of CD4+ T lymphocytes in depleted calves remained below pre-depletion levels for the duration of the study. CD4+ T lymphocytes failed to be effectively depleted from a non-thymectomized mAb treated calf. Calves depleted of CD4+ T lymphocytes and immunized with ovalbumin had suppressed and delayed antibody responses to ovalbumin. Depletion of CD4+ T lymphocytes also abrogated ovalbumin-specific lymphoproliferative responses. This model will be used in subsequent planned studies to test the hypothesis that CD4+ T lymphocytes are required in calves for control of acute anaplasmosis.

WINNER'S BIOGRAPHY: Reginald A. Valdez received his Doctor of Veterinary Medicine (D.V.M.) degree from Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO and Master of Science (M.S.) degree in veterinary parasitology from the University of Illinois in Champaign-Urbana, IL. He is currently completing a combined research training program as a Ph.D. candidate in veterinary immunology and Resident in Comparative Anatomic Pathology in the Department of Veterinary Microbiology and Pathology and the Washington Animal Disease Diagnostic Laboratory at Washington State University in Pullman, WA. His current employment is with the United States Department of Agriculture/Agricultural Research Service, Pacific West Area Animal Disease Research Unit in Pullman, WA as a Veterinary Medical Officer. The focus of his Ph.D. dissertation involves the development of an in vivo T lymphocyte depletion model, in thymectomized calves, to investigate lymphocyte-mediated immunity during acute infection with tick-borne hemoparasitic pathogens. His major advisor is Dr. Don Knowles, Associate Professor in the Department of Veterinary Microbiology and Pathology and the USDA/ARS ADRU Research Leader. His research involves active collaboration in the laboratories of his co-advisors, Drs. Wendy Brown, Travis McGuire, William Davis and Terry McElwain of the Department of Veterinary Microbiology and Pathology at Washington State University in Pullman, WA.

 

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Accompanying Guest Agenda

(Please see Registration Information for further detail on costs and deadlines.)

Saturday, June 12, 1999
 7:00pm-9:00pm    Welcome Reception at the
                  Truman White House

Sunday, June 13, 1999
        8:30am    Brunch on Sunset Key Island

Monday, June 14, 1999
 6:00pm-8:00pm    Social Hour on the Pier

Tuesday, June 15, 1999
7:00pm-10:00pm    Sunset Luau Dinner Buffet 

Wednesday, June 16, 1999
9:00am-10:00am    Closing Awards Breakfast


Beaches

Several public beaches are located on the island. You can rent Hobie Cats, sail boards, go parasailing, tubing, water-skiing or just stroll along the beach. Chose from several public beaches including Clarence Higgs and Rest Beach, or take the ferry to the exclusive, luxurious setting on the Hilton’s private Sunset Key Island. 

Whether it’s shopping, museums, snorkeling, beaches or just plain relaxing, the island is a honeycomb of opportunities for all. Check out the conference web site for more information including maps, directories and color photographs. 

Museums

Next door is the Key West Aquarium where you can see daily shark feedings and be introduced to a variety of native ocean life. Right across the street is the 100-year old Key West Shipwreck Historeum, where artifacts from the American merchant ship, Isaac Allerton, are on display. Next door is a cluster of stores called the Sunset Shops, a convenient stop for a drink or souvenir browsing. 

Mel Fisher’s Maritime Museum is in this same area and houses a dazzling collection of gold, silver, jewels and artifacts salvaged from the sunken Spanish galleon, Atocha. Another attraction of note is the Victorian Curry Mansion, featuring 22 rooms decorated with ornate woodwork, antiques and Tiffany glass. The nearby Custom House built in 1891 is one of Florida’s best examples of Romanesque Revival architecture. 

Some call Duval Street the longest street in the world because it connects the Atlantic Ocean to the Gulf of Mexico. Duval and Whitehead, two parallel streets a block apart, together comprise a wonderful walking tour of Key West. On Whitehead Street is the Ernest Hemingway House, where the author wrote many of his famous novels. The Audubon House and Gardens is another good stop. Many of John James Audubon’s original engravings are on display. 

And be sure to stop and explore the many side streets and alleys off Duval. You won’t want to miss the Heritage House, once owned by Miss Jessie Porter, a pioneer in historical restoration, or the Robert Frost Cottage where the poet stayed when he came to visit. 

Shopping & Entertainment

Shopping is at its best in Key West with door to door exquisite jewelry stores, studios, art galleries, and pottery shops. Key West combines small-town charm with cosmopolitan flair. 

Mallory Square is famous the world over for its spectacular views of sunsets and for the street performers that entertain the nightly crowds. Jugglers, escape artists, tightrope walkers and animal trainers entertain the crowd that show up for the nightly  sunset into the sea. Some say that if atmospheric conditions are just right, you can see the “green flash,” a burst of color, that happens right as the sun falls below the horizon. 
 
 

Be sure to complete  the Guest Registration Form.
 Click here for appropriate forms.
 

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Registration Information
Registration Fees - All fees must be submitted in US dollars ($). 

Early Registration: (Before March 1, 1999)

STVM Members $ 395
Non-members* $ 425
Guest $ 195
Child (10 & under) $ 30
Regular Registration: (After March 1, 1999)
STVM Members $ 450
Non-members* $ 475
Guest $ 225
Child (10 & under) $ 50
On-site Registration:
STVM Members $ 500
Non-members* $ 530
The full registration fee includes one copy of the program abstracts, one proceedings to be mailed following the conference, a welcome reception at the Truman White House, a sunset luau dinner buffet, a poster session social, a social hour, the business meeting breakfast and daily refreshment breaks.
* The non-member registration fee includes a complimentary two-year membership in STVM.

Click here to register. 

Spouse, Guest & Child Registration 

The spouse, guest and child registration fee includes the welcome reception, a social hour on the pier, the sunset luau dinner buffet and the business meeting breakfast. We will also be hosting a Sunday Brunch for guest and child registrants to be held June 13 on the beautiful Sunset Key Island. 

Click here to register. 
 
 


Special Needs

Participants with special needs can be reasonably accommodated by contacting the Office of Conferences & Institutes at least 10 working days prior to the conference. We can be reached by phone at 1-352-392-5930, by fax at 1-352-392-4044, or by calling 1-800-955-8771 (TDD).
 
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Online Registration Forms and Manuscript Instructions

Directions: "Online" submission provides forms which permit you to submit the subject forms or applications online.

By choosing the "PDF file" option, you may print a "hard copy" form to your printer via Adobe Acrobat Reader. This form may then be returned by either FAX or mailed as indicated on the form.
You will need Adobe Acrobat Reader to open and print the PDF form files. 
 
Meeting Registration:
  • Online Credit Card Registration
  • Printable PDF file (mail or FAX)
  • STVM 
    Membership Application:
  • Printable PDF file
  • Spouse, Guest & Child Registration:
  • Online Credit Card Registration
  • Printable PDF file
  • Manuscript Instructions:
  • Printable PDF file
  • Hotel Registration:
  • Printable PDF file
  • Poster Confirmation
    and Instructions:
  • Printable PDF file
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    Conference Accommodations

    245 Front Street
    Key West, Florida 33040
    PH: 305-294-4000 / FAX: 305-294-4086

    Sunset Key Beach Services

    The Key West Hilton Resort and Marina has a private beach with restaurant and bar located on an island called Sunset Key. There is a charge of $8.00 per person to travel by ferry to the island, and the charge is good for the entire day with an unlimited number of trips. The beach service charge is optional, and is paid by individual guests on a "per request" basis.

    Reservations

    A block of rooms is being held at the Key West Hilton Resort and Marina at a special room rate of $125.00 plus 11.5% tax with one or two people in a room. Additional persons are $20.00 each. As this is a discounted group rate, it is non-commissonable to travel agents and Frequent Traveler Points do not apply. The group rate will be honored three days prior and three days following the conference, based on availability. For your convenience, a Hotel Reservation Form is available online, or you can call the hotel directly at 1-305-294-4000. The deadline to make your reservation and still receive the discounted group rate is April 15, 1999. After this date, guest rooms and the group rate may no longer be available.

    When making your reservation, be sure to state you are attending the Society for Tropical Veterinary Medicine Conference and specify [Group Code U0F706] in order to receive the group rate. A deposit equal to one night's room and tax for each confirmed reservation will be due at the time the reservation is made.

    Click here for appropriate forms.

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    Transportation

    Direct flights to Key West are available from any of three major international airports: Orlando, Tampa or Miami.
     

    Airlines Flying to Key West

    Miami International Airport

    Orlando International Airport

    Tampa International Airport
     

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    Related Websites of Interest


    Society for Tropical Veterinary Medicine Homepage
    Nasty
    Diseases
    Website

    The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene

    Anaerobe Society of the Americans

    American Association for Laboratory Animal Science

    American Association of Veterinary Immunologists

    Association of American Veterinary Medical Colleges

    Tropical & SubTropical Agricultural
    Research 

    Caribbean Amblyomma Programme
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     One-Day  Snorkeling Excursion Off the Dry Tortugas

    Almost 70 miles west of the keys lies a group of seven islands composed of coral reefs and sand called The Dry Tortugas. It is an area known world wide for its bird and marine life, and pirate legends. The Dry Tortugas is surrounded by clear, shallow waters and optimal conditions for reef growth and sea life of every description. Diving, bird watching, snorkeling and exploration of the historic fort are some of the activities available.

    A 100 foot high-speed supercruiser departs the Land’s End Marina (four blocks from the Key West Hilton) at 8am and returns at 7pm. The trip is approximately two and a half hours by boat one-way. The cruiser has an air-conditioned cabin, complete galley, full bar and spacious sun deck. So, be sure to pack your sunscreen and register for this excursion. It’s an absolutely amazing place to visit, and it may turn out to be one of the most memorable events in your lifetime. The cost to participate is $75/person and includes breakfast, lunch and snorkel gear. Be sure to indicate your interest on the Conference Registration Form ( Click here )

    Dry Tortugas
    National Park was named
    To the World Wildlife Fund’s
    "Top 10 Coolest Places
    You’ve Never Been"

    More information about Dry Tortugas is tour is available at the National Park Service, Dry Tortugas Web Site.

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    Area Information


    Key West Information 

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    STVM Officers & Conference Organizers

    President: Emmanuel Camus, CIRAD, Guadeloupe

    President-elect & STVM ’99 Conference Chair: Paul Gibbs, University of Florida

    Past President and STVM ’99 Program Co-Chair: James House, USDA APHIS, Plum Island, NY

    Secretary: Edmour Blouin, Oklahoma State University

    Treasurer: Thomas Walton, USDA APHIS, Washington, DC

    Councilors: Frans Jongejan, University of Utrecht, The Netherlands
               Christopher Groocock, USDA, American Embassy, Vienna, Austria
               Patricia Conrad, University of California
               Kenneth Platt, Iowa State University

    Student Chapter Chair: Patricia Conrad, University of California

    Governmental Liaison: Bob Bokma, USDA APHIS, Washington, DC

    STVM ’99 Program Co-Chair: Katherine Kocan, Oklahoma State University

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    For Further Information

    Additional Conference Program Information:

    Dr. Paul Gibbs
    University of Florida
    Veterinary Medicine - Pathobiology
    Bldg. 1017, PO Box 100880, Gainesville, FL 32611-0880
    PHONE: 1-352-392-4700 ext. 5882 / FAX: 1-352-392-5793
    EMAIL: pgibbs@ufic.ufl.edu

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