USDA-CSREES
National Water Quality Conference:
Integrating Research, Extension
and Education

January 11-14, 2004
Belleview Biltmore Resort, Golf Club & Spa
Clearwater, Florida

 

SITE INDEX

l Background l Call for Abstracts l Registration Information
l Conference Objectives l Preliminary Agenda l Hotel Information
l Who Should Attend? l Posters l Clearwater, FL Information

l Conference Format

l Field Trips l For More Information


Background

The USDA-Cooperative State Research, Education, and Extension Service (CSREES) Water Quality Program brings university scientists, instructors, and extension educators into more effective and efficient partnerships with Federal interagency priority programs while addressing water quality issues in U.S. agriculture. This program also provides the flexibility necessary for CSREES to bring the resources of researchers, instructors, and extension educators into national initiatives and programmatic partnerships that target evolving water quality needs.

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Conference Objectives

The conference will provide opportunities for water quality professionals engaged in research, extension, and education to share knowledge and ideas, to identify and update emerging issues, and to network with the CSREES National Water Quality Program. State water quality coordinators will learn the latest information about water quality issues in other states and at the federal level.

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Who Should Attend?

  • State extension water quality coordinators.

  • University scientists, instructors, and extension educators who focus their efforts on water quality.

  • USDA-CSREES staff members who work directly or indirectly with state water quality specialists.

  • USEPA staff involved with water quality issues.

  • Others who work with or for public or private institutions involved with water quality issues.

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Conference Format

Invited and a limited number of volunteer speakers will address a wide range of issues associated with water quality research, education, and extension during the general session and concurrent sessions. The majority of volunteer presenters will be scheduled to present their information in an evening poster session. There will be plenty of opportunity for interaction during Q&A, topical discussion periods and networking functions.

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Call for Abstracts


The Call for Abstracts will begin June 23, 2003 and conclude on September 1, 2003. The program committee will review all abstract submittals, make selection of oral and poster presenters and notify all authors in October whether accepted for presentation or not.  In October, the conference agenda will list all presenters. All
abstracts will be posted to the National Water Quality web site (www.usawaterquality.orgin December for viewing by conference participants and others.
 
DEADLINE FOR ABSTRACT SUBMISSION HAS PASSED

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Preliminary Agenda

Agenda Index

 

Sunday, January 11, 2004

12:00pm–5:00pm

Golf Outing "Water Quality Open"

1:00pm–5:00pm

Deep Sea Fishing

4:00pm–7:00pm Region 8 Meeting

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Monday, January 12, 2004

8:00am–12:00pm Florida Botanical Gardens
8:15am–12:00pm Honeymoon Island State Park
8:30am–12:00pm Clearwater Harbor Boat Ride

1:00pm–4:00pm

State Water Quality Coordinators Meeting

1:00pm–6:00pm

Conference Registration Open and Poster Presenters to set up Displays
Internet Cafe Open

2:00pm-3:30pm 1890-1994 Planning Committee Meeting

4:00pm–6:00pm

Regional Project and Special Project Meetings
Region 1
Region 2
Region 3
Region 4 & 6
Region 5
Region 7
Region 8
Region 9
Region 10
1994 Institutions
1890 Institutions

6:00pm–8:00pm

Welcome Reception

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Tuesday, January 13, 2004

7:30am–8:30am

Morning Refreshments in Poster Display Area

7:30am–5:00pm

Conference Registration Open
Internet Cafe Open

8:30am–10:00am

General Session

Moderator: Greg Jennings, North Carolina State University

Status of the CSREES National WQ Program – Robin Shepard, University of Wisconsin and Mike O'Neill, Dan Kugler and Mike Tate, USDA-CSREES and Colien Hefferan, Administrator (Invited)
Florida Water Issues: Lessons Learned & Future Challenges – Peter Spyke, President, Arapaho Citrus Management Inc.

10:00am–10:30am

Morning Refreshments in Poster Display Area

10:30am–12:00pm

General Session

Moderator: Mark McFarland, Texas A&M University

Panel Discussion: Working Together -- Regional Successes, Areas Needing Improvement and Lessons Learned

Panelists:

Art Gold, University of Rhode Island

Eric Caldwell, NC Cooperative Extension Service, Transylvania County

Hank Zygmunt, USEPA

Pat Leavenworth, NRCS - Wisconsin, State Conservationist

12:00pm–1:30pm

Lunch on Your Own

1:30pm–3:00pm

Three Concurrent Sessions

Track A: Agriculture and Forestry Water Quality

A1 Agricultural Management

Moderator: Charles Barden, Kansas State University

1:30pm–1:50pm

Developing Cropland Nutrient Budgets in the Mid-Atlantic Region – Les Lanyon, Penn State University

1:50pm–2:10pm

Quantifying Phosphorus Losses in Agricultural Fields – John Norman, University of Wisconsin

2:10pm–2:30pm

Evaluation of Coalbed Methane Product Water Quality for Irrigation Use – K.J. Reddy, University of Wyoming

2:30pm–2:50pm

Application of GIS for Public Outreach Related to a Hog Facility Project – Bruce Seelig, North Dakota State University

2:50pm–3:00pm

General Discussion & Follow Up with Speakers

Track R: Rural and Community Water Quality

R1 Drinking Water

Moderator: Bob Mahler, University of Idaho

1:30pm–1:50pm

Extension Household Water Quality Education in Georgia – Jorge Atiles, The University of Georgia

1:50pm–2:10pm

Children's Environmental Health Partnership - Robert Williamson, North Carolina A&T State University Cooperative Extension

2:10pm–2:30pm

Private Well and Septic System Management Education Program – Thomas H Miller, University of Maryland Cooperative Extension

2:30pm–2:50pm

Levels of Exposure to Arsenic from Private Wells in Churchill County, Nevada – Mark Walker, University of Nevada

2:50pm–3:00pm

General Discussion & Follow Up with Speakers

Track W: Watershed Management

W1 Nutrients

Moderator: Chris Obropta, Rutgers Cooperative Extension

1:30pm–1:50pm

Predicting Nitrogen Losses from Poorly Drained Watersheds – Wayne Skaggs, North Carolina State University

1:50pm–2:10pm

Water Quality Change by Pulsed Riverine Water Inputs to a Coastal Watershed In Louisiana – Jae-Young Ko, Louisiana State University/ CEI

2:10pm–2:30pm

A Watershed Model to Compare Alternative Phosphorus Control Strategies – Nancy Mesner, Utah State University

2:30pm–2:50pm

Measuring The Flux Of Nitrogen From Watersheds:  Errors And The Temporal Resolution Problem – William Showers, North Carolina State University

2:50pm–3:00pm

General Discussion & Follow Up with Speakers

3:00pm–3:30pm

Afternoon Refreshments in Poster Display Area

3:30pm–5:00pm

Three Concurrent Sessions

Track A: Agriculture and Forestry Water Quality

A2 Farmer Education

Moderator: John Tharp, University of Missouri

3:30pm–3:50pm

Meeting North Carolina's Phosphorus Challenges – Deanna Osmond, North Carolina State University

3:50pm–4:10pm

Financial Safety Net for Corn Farmers Who Use Nutrient BMPs – Thomas Green, IPM Institute of North America

4:10pm–4:30pm

The OnePlan Conservation Planner: A Pre-test – Wayne Newbill and Jeanne Brittingham, Idaho Association of Soil Conservation Districts

4:30pm–4:50pm

A Multi-Agency Grant Program to Help Conservation Professionals Educate Producers – Andrew Yencha, University of Wisconsin Cooperative Extension

4:50pm–5:00pm

General Discussion & Follow Up with Speakers

Track R: Rural and Community Water Quality

R2 Water Education

Moderator: Elizabeth Herron, University of Rhode Island

3:30pm–3:50pm

Water Quality Assessment at Underserved Farms – Asmare Atalay, Virginia State University

3:50pm–4:10pm

Programming to Reach New Audiences: The Process – Ellen Smoak, NCA&T State University/Cooperative Extension

4:10pm–4:30pm

Programming to Reach New Audiences: The Product – Robert Williamson, NCA&T State University/Cooperative Extension

4:30pm–4:50pm

Best Practices for Water Outreach Education – Elaine Andrews, University of Wisconsin

4:50pm–5:00pm

General Discussion & Follow Up with Speakers

Track W: Watershed Management

W2 Pathogens

Moderator: Rafael Davila, University of Puerto Rico

3:30pm–3:50pm

Identifying Host-Specific Markers Of Fecal Pollution Using Mixed-Genome Microarrays – Douglas Call, Washington State University

3:50pm–4:10pm

Determining Sources of Fecal Contamination of Surface Water Using Antibiotic Sensitivity Patterns – Yvette Johnson, University of Maryland College Park

4:10pm–4:30pm

Integrated Watershed-Based Molecular And Hydrologic Monitoring Techniques To Assess Pathogen Loading – Nancy White, UNC Coastal Studies Institute

4:30pm–4:50pm

Differentiating Among, And Quantifying Sources Of Fecal Contamination For Model Development – Rachel Noble, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

4:50pm–5:00pm

General Discussion & Follow Up with Speakers

5:00pm–7:00pm

Poster Session & Networking Reception

7:00pm–9:00pm Web Content Workshop

7:00pm–9:00pm

Discussion Sessions

Session 1. How to Write a Successful Proposal for 406 and NRI Funding

Session 2. Water Quality Web Site Development

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Wednesday, January 14, 2004

7:30am–8:30am

Morning Refreshments in Poster Display Area

7:30am–5:00pm

Conference Registration Office Open
Internet Cafe Open

8:30am–10:00am

General Session

Moderator: Tom Simpson, University of Maryland

Science and Results: Performance Based Environmental Outcomes for Agriculture – Stanley Johnson, Vice Provost for Extension, Iowa State University
Innovative Approaches for Watershed Management – Diane Regas, Director of OWOW (Invited)
Future Directions of CSREES Water Programs – Mike O'Neill and Nancy Cavallaro, CSREES

10:00am–10:30am

Morning Refreshments in Poster Display Area

10:30am–12:00pm

Three Concurrent Sessions

Track A: Agriculture and Forestry Water Quality

A3 Forestry & Watershed Assessment

Moderator: Jamie Boehm, University of Nebraska-Lincoln

10:30am–10:50am

Forestry BMP Educational Needs and Assessment – Rick Hamilton, North Carolina State University

10:50am–11:10am

A Unique & Emerging Educational Tool: Forest*A*Syst CD – Kris Irwin, The University of Georgia

11:10am–11:30am

Development, Delivery and Evaluation of a Multi-Client Forestry BMP Education Program – Jeffrey Stringer, University of Kentucky

11:30am-11:50am

Integrated Systems Approach to Watershed Management – Robert Broz, University of Missouri

11:50am-12:00pm

General Discussion & Follow Up with Speakers

Track R: Rural and Community Water Quality
R3 Public Involvement

Moderator: Elaine Andrews, University of Wisconsin

10:30am–10:50am

What's the difference between a GWMA and an Iguana? – Gail Andrews, Oregon State University

10:50am–11:10am

Training Environmental Stewards: Integrating Water Quality & Quantity Education from Mountain to Oce – Brad Gaolach, Washington State University Cooperative Extension

11:10am–11:30am

Stormwater Wetland Installation at The North Carolina Arboretum, Asheville, NC – Jon Calabria, North Carolina State University

11:30am-11:50am

Using Surveys to Establish Priority Water Issues in the Pacific Northwest – Robert Mahler, University of Idaho

11:50am-12:00pm

General Discussion & Follow Up with Speakers

Track W: Watershed Management

W3 TMDLs

Moderator: Jane Frankenberger, Purdue University

10:30am–10:50am

Agricultural Runoff, TMDLs and Water Quality: Field and Watershed Scale, Science-Teacher Education – Joe Lepo, University of West Florida

10:50am–11:10am

The Role of Extension and Research in Implementing TMDLs in Kansas – Daniel Devlin, Kansas State University

11:10am–11:30am

Addressing Watershed Nonpoint Source Pollution With An Integrated Environmental And Economic Compute – Ali Saleh, Texas Institute for Applied Environmental Research

11:30am-11:50am

Developing Water Management Strategies for the Red River of the North Basin – Daniel Stepan, Energy & Environmental Research Center

11:50am-12:00pm

General Discussion & Follow Up with Speakers

12:00pm–1:30pm

Lunch on Own

1:30pm–3:00pm

Three Concurrent Sessions

Track A: Agriculture and Forestry Water Quality

A4 Waste Management

Moderator: Joe Lally, Iowa State University

1:30pm–1:50pm

Integrating Feed Nutrient Management into a CNMP – Richard Koelsch, University of Nebraska

1:50pm–2:10pm

Performance and Microbiology of Swine Wastewater Treatment Bioreactors – Francis de los Reyes III, North Carolina State University

2:10pm–2:30pm

Composting Home for The Penn State Organic Materials Processing and Education Center – Robert Graves, The Pennsylvania State University

2:30pm–2:50pm

Manure Nutrient Management for Amish Farms – Randall James, The Ohio State University Extension

2:50pm–3:00pm

General Discussion & Follow Up with Speakers

Track R: Rural and Community Water Quality
R4 Community BMPs

Moderator: Elizabeth Bird, University of Wisconsin 

1:30pm–1:50pm

Residential Pollution Prevention for a Coastal Community – Linda Howe, University of Vermont Extension

1:50pm–2:10pm

Working to Reduce Construction Site Impacts on Water Quality – Richard McLaughlin, North Carolina State University

2:10pm–2:30pm

Watershed Signage – Connie Alexander and Jennifer Gardner, USEPA

2:30pm–2:50pm

Applied Research Through Innovative Partnerships – Dennis Frame, University of Wisconsin Cooperative Extension

2:50pm–3:00pm

General Discussion & Follow Up with Speakers

Track W: Watershed Management

W4 Watershed Management

Moderator: Jeffrey Potent, Cornell University

1:30pm–1:50pm

Assessing Watershed Health Using the USDA Visual Stream Assessment Protocol – Katie Buckley, Rutgers Cooperative Extension

1:50pm–2:10pm

Acoustic Profiling System for Sediment Surveys of Flood Control Reservoirs – John Dunbar, Baylor University

2:10pm–2:30pm

Manipulation of Experimental Watersheds through BMPs: Fluxes, Fate and Transport – Joseph Makarewicz, State University of New York at Brockport

2:30pm–2:50pm

Evaluating Point-Nonpoint Source Pollutant Trading Opportunities In EPA Region 2 – Christopher Obropta, Rutgers Cooperative Extension

2:50pm–3:00pm

General Discussion & Follow Up with Speakers

3:00pm–3:30pm

Afternoon Refreshments in Poster Display Area

3:30pm–5:00pm

Poster Display Removal

3:30pm–5:00pm

Concurrent Sessions

Track A: Agriculture and Forestry Water Quality

A5 Livestock EMS

Moderator: Amanda Schielke, Kansas State University

3:30pm–3:50pm

Overview of Livestock Environmental Management System Pilot Projects – Elizabeth Bird, UW-Madison Environmental Resources Center

3:50pm–4:10pm

A Guidebook for Livestock Producers Interested in Implementing an EMS – Jill Heemstra, University of Nebraska-Lincoln

4:10pm–4:30pm

Livestock EMS development in Georgia – Mark Risse, The University of Georgia

4:30pm–4:50pm

Working with Producers - Developing an EMS for Swine Operation – Robert Rubin, North Carolina State University

4:50pm–5:00pm

General Discussion & Follow Up with Speakers

Track R: Rural and Community Water Quality
R5 Environmental Restoration

Moderator: Linda Green, University of Rhode Island

3:30pm–3:50pm

Accelerating Riparian Buffer Adoption to Enhance Water Quality and Farm Income – David Shelton, University of Nebraska

3:50pm–4:10pm

Stream Ecology, Restoration and Aquatic Education – William English, Clemson University

4:10pm–4:30pm

Stream Restoration: Natural Channel Design, Stormwater Management and Exotic Species Control – Jean Spooner, North Carolina State University

4:30pm–4:50pm

Native Plants in the Landscape: A Hands-on Approach to Protecting Water Resources – Erica Guttman, Washington State University

4:50pm–5:00pm

General Discussion & Follow Up with Speakers

Track W: Watershed Management

W5 Watershed Stewardship

Moderator: Jeffrey Potent, Cornell University

3:30pm–3:50pm

Assessing The Effectiveness Of The Watershed Stewards Program – John Jemison, University Of Maine Cooperative Extension

3:50pm–4:10pm

A Watershed Nutrient Management Decision Support System for the Eucha Basin – Marty Matlock, University of Arkansas

4:10pm–4:30pm

Region 10 Watershed Satellite Conferences Build Capacity and Facilitate Funding – Jan Seago, WSU Cooperative Extension - Thurston County

4:30pm–4:50pm

Improving Water Quality for Salmon Restoration through Integrated Research, Education and Extension – Shulin Chen, Washington State University

4:50pm–5:00pm

General Discussion & Follow Up with Speakers

5:30pm–7:00pm

Closing Reception and Continuing Discussion on 406 Grant Program

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Thursday, January 15, 2004

7:00am–10:00am

Region 8 Meeting

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Posters


CSL

The Mid-Atlantic Regional Water Quality Coordination Program - Jennifer Aiosa and Tom Simpson, University of Maryland

Southern Region Water Quality Information System - Diane Boellstorff, Texas Cooperative Extension

Southwest States and Pacific Islands Regional Water Quality Program: Building on Success - Christine French, CSREES Region IX

Region 10 (Pacific Northwest) Water Quality Program - Robert Mahler, University of Idaho

New England Region Water Quality Program - Alyson McCann, University of Rhode Island

The CSREES National Water Quality Program - Mark McFarland, USDA-CSREES

The Southern Region Water Quality Coordination Project - Mark McFarland, Texas A&M University

Heartland Regional Water Quality Coordination Initiative - Gerald Miller, Iowa State University

Water Quality Coordination in US EPA Region 2 - Jeffrey Potent, Cornell University

Great Lakes Regional Water Quality Coordination Program - Robin Shepard and Rebecca Power, University of Wisconsin    

Coordinated Agricultural Water Quality Programming for EPA Region VIII - Lloyd R Walker, Colorado State University Cooperative Extension

Agriculture

Policy Education for State Decision-making about CAFO Rules in the Mid-Atlantic Region – Charles Abdalla, Alyssa Dodd, Les Lanyon, and Robert Graves, Penn State University and Cooperative Extension

Cattle Production Practices in Grazed Watersheds of the Humid Region – Carmen Agouridis, University of Kentucky

Application of SIMPOTATO model for Nitrogen Management of Potato in Sandy Soils to Minimize Nitrate – Ashok Alva, USDA-ARS

Karst Campaign for Clean water, Productive Soil and Profitable Farms – Jim Anderson, University of Minnesota Extension Service

NO3-N Seasonal Fluctuation in Soil/Surface Water - Groundwater Continuums – G. Anguelov, I. Anguelova, N. Bailey and R. Bradford, Florida A&M University

Evaluation of Livestock Environmental Management System Pilot Projects – Elizabeth Bird, University of Wisconsin - Madison

Potential for Nitrogen Removal in Agricultural Headwater Streams – Virginie Bouchard, The Ohio State University

South Dakota Water Quality Activities: Assisting producers conduct on-farm research – David Clay, South Dakota State University

Simulation and Validation of Phosphorus Loading in Furrow Irrigation Tailwater – Albert Clemmens, USDA- ARS

A Policy Evaluation of Transport Subsidies for Poultry Litter in West Virginia – Alan Collins, West Virginia University

Change in Filter Strip Performance over Time – Michael Dosskey, USDA Forest Service

N- Vs. P-Based Manure Applications and Water Quality Impact – Zhengxia Dou, University of Pennsylvania

Multi-State Approach to Conservation Professional Development and Training – Kevin Erb, University of Wisconsin-Extension                      

Managing N and P in Manures and Biosolids in Virginia – Greg Evanylo, Virginia Tech

Land Application of Livestock Manure in Hawaii and the American Pacific, Carl Evensen, University of Hawaii

Control of Agricultural Loading Using Conservation Buffers – Thomas Franti, University of Nebraska

Influence of Nitrogen Rates on Yield of Staked Tomato and Ground Cover Effect on Residual Nitrates – C. S. Gardner, O. S. Mbuya, G. L. Queeley and H. M. Edwards, Florida A&M University; F. M. Rhoads, University of Florida

Mortality Disposal Alternative – Kevin Heflin, Texas Cooperative Extension

Best Management Practices for Selenium Prevention – Aung Hla, Colorado State University

Educating Amish on Best Management Practices – James Hoorman, The Ohio State University Extension

Fate and Transport of Sex Hormones from Poultry Litter Applied to Till and No Till Cropping Systems – Michael Jenkins, USDA-ARS

Alabama Farm*A*Syst Program for Low Income and Underserved Farmers -an Update – Jesse LaPrade, The Alabama Cooperative Extension System and Auburn University

A Farmer’s Guide to Agriculture and Water Quality Issues – Laura Lombardo, Jean Spooner, Don Meals, Ted Feitshans, Michael Burchell, Kris Bass, Brandon King, North Carolina State University; Bob Williamson and Ellen Smoak, North Carolina A&T University; Peter Wright, Cornell University; Brent Hallock, Cal Poly University; Bernard Engel, Purdue University; Mark Sobsey, University of NC at Chapel Hill North Carolina State University

Constructed Wetlands for Improving Water Quality of Agricultural Run-off in Northwest Louisiana – Eddie Millhollon, LSU Agricultural Center

Integrated Agricultural Management Systems for Improving Water Quality in Kansas – Jeffery Neel, Kansas State University

Environmentally Sound Uses for Poultry Litter – Doug Parker, Erik Lichtenberg and Lori Lynch, University of Maryland

Treatment of N in Swine Wastewater by Marsh-Pond-Marsh Constructed Wetlands – Gudigopuram Reddy, North Carolina A&T State University

Use of the SWAT Model for Modeling Manure Nutrient Imports in Turfgrass Sod to a Suburban Watershed – Chad Richards, Texas A&M University

Integration of Spatial Technologies to Modernize Resource Management in Alabama – Donn Rodekohr, Auburn University

Application of GIS for Public Outreach Related to a Hog Facility Project – Bruce Seelig, North Dakota State University

Evaluation of Cow-Calf BMPs for Controlling P Discharges in the Lake Okeechobee Basin – Sanjay Shukla, Univ. of Florida

Innovation in Agricultural Conservation for the Chesapeake Bay – Tom Simpson, University of Maryland; Connie Musgrove, U.S. EPA; and Ron Korcak, USDA- ARS

Nutrient Management Science in Policy in Maryland - Tom Simpson and Scott Angle, University of Maryland

Environmental Management Systems for the Iowa Beef Feedlot Industry - Jim Venner and John Lawrence, Iowa State University

Are Benches in Agricultural Ditches a Benefit? – Andy Ward, The Ohio State University

Environmental Training for the Arkansas Livestock Industry – Melony Wilson and Susan Watkins, University of Arkansas 

Rural

Tools for Prioritizing Ground Water Protection in Colorado – Troy Bauder, Colorado State University

Pollution Prevention Assessment and Action – What Value is Added by National Theme Facilitation? – Elizabeth Bird, UW-Madison Environmental Resources Center

Water Quality Education and Outreach in Texas – Diane Boellstorff, Texas Cooperative Extension

Surface Water Resource Development – Bill Branch, LSU AgCenter

Stormwater Wetland Installation at The North Carolina Arboretum, Asheville, NC – Jon Calabria, North Carolina State University

An Update of Water Quality Survey in Tribal Communities in Florida, Montana and Tennessee –Sam Dennis, Tennessee State University

Stormwater Management in Your Own Backyard - Lisa Galloway Evrard, Rutgers Cooperative Extension

Effectively Working with Volunteer Monitors – Linda Green, Elizabeth Herron, Kris Stepenuck, Arthur Gold, Robin Shepard and Kelly Addy, Rhode Island & Wisconsin Extension

Reaching Communities Across Arizona With Water Education - D. Phillip Guertin, University of Arizona

Hands-on Education Tools: The FUNdamentals of agricultural and urban non-point source pollution – Gary Hawkins, The University of Georgia

Study on the Infiltration Rate of Permeable Pavements – Bill Hunt, North Carolina State University

Tailoring Educational Strategies to Mobilize Landscapers' Pollution Prevention Behaviors – Mrill Ingram, Farm and Home Environmental Management Programs

Stream Restoration Training and Demonstration in Southeastern USA – Greg Jennings, North Carolina State University

Effective Nitrate Pollution Control with Electrokinetics – Dennis Larson, University of Arizona

Healthy Landscapes: Protecting Water Quality in Rural Landscapes – Alyson McCann, University of Rhode Island

Drinking Water Education in Under-served Communities - LaDonna McCowan and Mike Smolen, Oklahoma State Extension 

Influence of Landscape Change on Variable Saturation Areas – Mahmood Nachabe, University of South Florida

A Multidisciplinary Approach to Water Quality Education – Thomas Obreza, University of Florida

Water Outreach Education--A National Facilitation Project – Kate Reilly, University of Wisconsin-Madison

Fifteen Years of the Land Grant/EPA Partnership – Jan Seago, WSU Cooperative Extension - Thurston County; Marilyn Freeman, University of Idaho; Karl Arne and Bevin Reid, EPA Region 10

Developing a Unified Message Concerning Water in Georgia - Rose Mary Seymour, Georgia Cooperative Extension – The University of Georgia

Fostering Locally-Led, Voluntary Watershed Management – John Tharp, University of Missouri

Assessment of Contamination in Land To Be Reclaimed as Surface Water, Wetland, or Riparian Habitat – William Tucker, MACTEC Engineering & Consulting, Inc.

Low-Impact Development Practices for the Virgin Islands – Julie Wright, University of the Virgin Islands, Cooperative Extension 

Watershed


The North Fork "A Model Watershed Project"
- Thomas Basden, West Virginia University

TMDL - Extension Leadership in Objective Baseline Data Collection and Assessment - James Bauder, Montana State University

The Role of the Land-Grant University in the TMDL Process - Brian Benham, Virginia Tech

Site Factors Affecting Riparian Groundwater Nitrate Removal - Art Gold, D.Q. Kellogg and P.M. Groffman, University of Rhode Island

An Internet-based Spatial Decision Support System for Rangeland Watershed Management - D. Phillip Guertin, University of Arizona

Hydrilla Control in Henderson Lake - Thomas Hymel, LSU AgCenter/Sea Grant

The Missouri Watershed Initiative - Comprehensive Watershed Planning - William Kurtz, University of Missouri-Columbia

Mississippi River Water, Agriculture, and Wetlands - Brian LeBlanc, LSU AgCenter

Scaling and Modeling of Stream and Ground Water Quality in the East Mahantango Creek Watershed - Henry Lin, Penn State University

Marketing the Pacific Northwest Water Quality Program - Robert Mahler, University of Idaho

Use of Research and Modeling Information in Community-based Watershed Planning - Gerald Miller, Iowa State University

Paired Watershed Studies for Nutrient Reductions in the Minnesota River Basin - D. J. Mulla, University of Minnesota

Evaluation of Web-based Training on Water Resources for Extension Professionals - Matt Neibauer, Colorado State University Cooperative Extension

Watershed Education for Communities and Local Officials (WECO) - Christy Perrin,  North Carolina State University

Coastal Eutrophication and Productivity of Clams and Oysters - Edward Phlips, University of Florida

Effects of Modified Nutrient Conditions on Phytoplankton in the Neuse River Estuary-Pamlico Sound - Michael Piehler, UNC Chapel Hill Institute of Marine Sciences

Development of an Integrated Watershed Information Management for Long-term Facilities Stewardship - Ahmed Said, University of South Florida

Protecting and Improving Washington State’s Waters:  The WSU Water Quality Management Team - Robert Simmons, Washington State University

Integrated Pollution Source Inventory (IPSI) in Pond Creek Watershed - George Smith, University of Tennessee Agricultural Extension Service

Green Country Watershed Education - Michael Smolen and Mitch Fram, Oklahoma State University Cooperative Extension

The Red River Water Management Consortium - Daniel Stepan, Energy & Environmental Research Center

Integrating Extension, Research and Education in Kentucky - William Thom, University of Kentucky 

Characterization of the Presence of Selected Carbamate and Organo-phosphate pesticides in Surface Discharge Water leaving a Typical South Florida Agricultural Watershed - Chris Wilson, University of Florida/IFAS Indian River Research and Education Center

Norflurazon Toxicity to Vallisneria americana - Chris Wilson, University of Florida/IFAS Indian River Research and Education Center

 

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Field Trips

Sunday, January 11, 2004

Golf Outing "Water Quality Open"

Please join us at the Belleview Biltmore Golf Club from Noon to 5:00 pm on their 18-hole world class course (designed by Donald Ross and recently restored to his classic design). An informal tournament will be organized using the Stableford scoring system. You need to supply a handicap on the conference registration form in order to participate. Prizes will be awarded to the top three finishers. The minimum number needed to hold the "Water Quality Open" is 12. At this time, no maximum number has been set.

Deep Sea Fishing

Take this opportunity to discuss issues with your peers while wrestling your catch of the day, all from the deck of a 42' sport fishing boat, the Mar-Chelle II. All fishing equipment will be provided. Please wear comfortable clothes, sneakers and sunscreen for an afternoon on the Gulf of Mexico. We'll be fishing for grouper, snapper, mackerel and kingfish. A minimum of 18 people is needed and 38 is the maximum allowed aboard.

Monday, January 12, 2004

Honeymoon Island State Park - Photo by Paula ShowenHoneymoon Island State Park

Linda Taylor with It's Our Nature will led a hike at Honeymoon Island State Park. The Osprey trail takes us through a virgin slash pine forest and meets with the Pelican Cove trail where we will explore the shoreline community of this barrier island. The total walk is a moderately paced two and one half miles. Because January is nesting season for osprey the nature hike is limited to 25 people. Minimum needed to register is 12.


Clearwater Harbor Eco-Cruise

At Clearwater Aquarium we will board their 45 passenger boat for a 2-hour eco-cruise around Clearwater Harbor. Their biologist will discuss the flora and fauna of the area. Be prepared to get your hands wet because we'll conduct some basic H2O quality testing (salinity, pH, nitrogen compounds, etc.) and discuss the water quality issues facing the area. The biologist will pull an otter trawl and plankton net then discuss the organisms caught. Minimum needed to conduct the boat ride is 20 people. And the maximum is 45.

Florida Botanical Gardens 

Please join us for a walking tour of nature, gardens, and history in the heart of Pinellas County, Florida. A portion of your 3-hour visit will be spent with staff from both Pinellas County Environmental Management and the Pinellas County Extension Service, who will discuss the controls and practices utilized by the County to protect the local watershed. After the formal tour you will have ample time to enjoy beautiful Florida Botanical Gardens and Heritage Village, a restored collection of relocated pioneer-era structures. Minimum needed to register for the tour is 25 people, and the maximum is 45.

NOTES:

- For all field trips, please wear comfortable clothes and shoes. And remember to bring a hat, sunscreen and bug spray.

- All prices on the registration form include round trip transportation from the hotel, as well as admission fees

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Registration Information

Registration Fees

The meeting registration fee includes a welcome reception on Monday, early morning, mid-day and afternoon refreshments each day, a poster reception on Tuesday, a closing reception on Wednesday and conference materials. The spouse/guest registration fee includes all three receptions (welcome, poster and closing).

 

All figures are presented in US dollars ($).

 

Early Registration
by December 10, 2003

Meeting Attendees...............................................................
Spouses/Guests....................................................................
Optional Golf Outing (Jan. 11)..............................................
Optional Deep Sea Fishing (Jan. 11).....................................
Optional Honeymoon Is. State Park (Jan. 12).......................
Optional Clearwater Harbor Boat Ride (Jan. 12)..................
Optional Florida Botanical Gardens (Jan. 12)........................

$250
$100
  $60
  $45
  $30
  $25
  $15

Regular Registration
after December 10, 2003

Meeting Attendees...............................................................
Spouses/Guests....................................................................
Optional Golf Outing (Jan. 11)..............................................
Optional Deep Sea Fishing (Jan. 11).....................................
Optional Honeymoon Is. State Park (Jan. 12).......................
Optional Clearwater Harbor Boat Ride (Jan. 12)..................
Optional Florida Botanical Gardens (Jan. 12)........................

$300
$150
  $75
  $60
  $45
  $40
  $30

 

We are delighted you wish to register for the USDA-CSREES
National Water Quality Conference. While Advance Registration is closed, we will be happy to register you onsite at the conference, and look forward to your participation. Thank you.


Refund Policy:
Requests for registration refunds will be honored if a written notification of cancellation is received by the Office of Conferences & Institutes on or before December 29, 2003.
A $50.00 processing fee will be deducted from all registration refunds. Sorry, no refunds will be honored for cancellations after December 29, 2003.


Special Needs:
Participants with special needs can be reasonably accommodated by contacting the Office of Conferences & Institutes at least 10 working days prior to the conference. We can be reached by phone at
1-352-392-5930, by fax at 1-352-392-9734, or by calling 1-800-955-8771 (TDD). The TDD number can only be accessed from within the State of Florida.
 

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Hotel Information

 

25 Belleview Blvd.
Clearwater, Florida 33756
Phone: 727-373-3000 or 800-237-8947
Fax: 727-373-3717
WWW: www.belleviewbiltmore.com

The conference will be held at the Belleview Biltmore Resort, Golf Club & Spa located on the Intracoastal Waterway in Clearwater. Conveniently located in the heart of the greater Tampa Bay metropolitan area, the resort is just 25 miles from the Tampa International Airport.

The Belleview Biltmore Resort, Golf Club & Spa is offering participants of the USDA-CSREES National Water Quality Conference a special guest room rate of $93.00 plus 11% tax with one or two people in a room and $103.00 with three people. The group rate will be honored three days prior and three days following the conference, based on availability. Contact the hotel at 1-800-237-8947. Be sure to identify yourself as being with the USDA National Water Quality Conference.

All reservation requests will require a guarantee with a credit card or a one-night advance payment on or before December 11, 2003. This advance payment is non-refundable if the guest does not arrive as schedules, or changes or cancels the reservation less than 24 hours prior to arrival. After December 11, the discounted group rate may not be available.

Rooms are available for check-in on the day of arrival after 3:00pm. Checkout is at 12:00 noon. If you are arriving early or leaving late, the resort has a secured baggage area.

Please note: As this is a discounted group rate, it is not commissionable to travel agents. Government employees with a state of Florida tax exempt certificate must present it along with their government credit card, in order to receive exempt status.

If you prefer to make your reservation by mail or FAX, you may click the link below for a printable PDF file that can be completed and returned to the Hotel.

Currently, the resort has no rooms available. Please contact the Adam's Mark Clearwater Beach Resort at 727-443-5714 and identify yourself as being with the National Water Quality Conference. The Adam's Mark is offering participants a rate of $95/night for one or two people in a room.

If you prefer to make your reservation by mail or fax., you may click the link below for a printable PDF file that can be completed and returned to the Hotel.

Hotel Reservation Form

Note: You need Adobe Acrobat Reader installed to open and print the PDF file. (Available for free download.)

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Conference Sponsors

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Clearwater, Florida Information


Tampa International Airport


Special Water Quality
Conference Rates

 


Special Rates for
Belleview Biltmore Guests

 

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For More Information

Local Arrangements Coordinator
Dr. Thomas Obreza
Professor
Soil & Water Science Department
University of Florida/IFAS
PO Box 110290
Gainesville, FL 32611-0290
PHONE: 352-392-1951 ext. 243
FAX: 352-392-3902
EMAIL: taob@ifas.ufl.edu
Conference Coordinator
Ms. Shelby Tatlock
Office of Conferences and Institutes (OCI)
University of Florida/IFAS
PO Box 110750
Building 639, Mowry Road
Gainesville, FL 32611 USA
PHONE: 1-352-392-5930
FAX: 1-352-392-9734
EMAIL: mktatlock@ifas.ufl.edu


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