SITE INDEX
Objective
& Focus
Field Trip
Workshop
Sponsors
Who Should
Attend?
Optional Evening in Ybor City
Host Hotel Information
Benefits of
Attending
Registration
Information
 About St. Petersburg
Tentative
Agenda
 Call for Abstracts
Related Sites
of Interest

Poster
Directory

Organizing
Committee

Photo Gallery

Conference Abstract Book & Program (PDF)

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smpectinid01.jpg (709304 bytes) Objective and Focus

The workshop is dedicated to the dissemination of knowledge concerning the scallop species of the world, particularly those of commercial importance. Pectinids have a worldwide economic and ecological importance as evidenced by the more than 125 participants from 25 countries who attend the workshops. The 14th workshop will focus on the biology, taxonomy, reproduction, physiology, fisheries, aquaculture and economics of scallops. We invite both oral and poster presentations of topics including taxonomy, genetics, algal toxins, nutrition, growth and mortality, reproduction, larval recruitment, predation, stock assessment and restoration, diseases, aquaculture techniques, and economics. Participants will have the unique opportunity to “network” with fellow researchers, resource managers, aquaculturists, conservationists, fishermen, and economists.

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SHELLS.jpg (318581 bytes) Who Should Attend?

  • Shellfish Farmers
  • Shellfish Hatchery Managers
  • Shellfish Aquaculture Equipment Suppliers
  • Shellfish Processors and Wholesalers
  • Shellfish Retailers
  • Shellfish Economists
  • Shellfish Importers and Exporters
  • Scallop Fishermen
  • Fisheries Biologists
  • Scallop Taxonomists
  • Shellfish Geneticists
  • Scallop Enthusiasts
  • Shellfish Ecologists and Physiologists
  • Shellfish Conservationists
  • Scallop Restoration Biologists
  • Shellfish Resource Managers
  • Shellfish Regulators from Local, National and International Agencies
  • Shellfish Aquaculture Program Administrators
  • Investors and Potential Investors in Scallop Aquaculture
  • Students and Faculty of Shellfish Biology
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Benefits of Attending

DOLPHIN.jpg (321153 bytes) Interest in scallops is rapidly expanding especially as the world demand for the meats have increased and natural stocks have dwindled. Prices have risen dramatically making aquaculture a viable addition to natural harvests. One whole book is dedicated to scallop biology and shellfish journals are receiving more manuscripts than can be published.

The workshop allows for the most recent information to be exchanged and updated. The book of abstracts to be provided to each participant will be informative and will contain the essence of each presentation. Scallop shells have an intrinsic aesthetic value and have served as religious emblems and decoration throughout much of the world. Participants are invited to display both recent and fossil scallops from around the world and opportunities for exchange of shells is encouraged.

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Tentative Agenda
 

Agenda Index

  • Wednesday, April 23, 2003
  • Thursday, April 24, 2003
         - Session I - Aquaculture
         - Session II - Aquaculture
         - Session III - Fisheries
  • Friday, April 25, 2003
         - Session IV - Fisheries
         - Session V - Fisheries
         - Session VI - Fisheries
  • Saturday, April 26, 2003
         - Session VII - Biochemistry/Genetics
         - Session VIII - Biochemistry/Genetics
         - Session IX - Aquaculture
         - Session X - Aquaculture
  • Sunday, April 27, 2003
  • Monday, April 28, 2003
         - Session XI - Resource Management
         - Session XII - Resource Management
         - Session XIII - Physiology
         - Session XIV - Physiology
  • Tuesday, April 29, 2003
         - Session XV - Economics
  •  SHIP_SUN.jpg (235873 bytes)

                                                      Return to Main Index

    Note: Presenting authors appear in bold.  Student presenters are designated by an asterisk (*).

    Wednesday, April 23, 2003

    4:00pm-7:00pm

    Registration Office Open

    6:00pm-9:00pm
    Return to Agenda Index

    Welcome Social at USF Harborside Park

    Thursday, April 24, 2003

    7:00am-5:00pm

    Registration Office Open

    7:00am-8:30am

    Early Morning Refreshments

    8:30am -10:00am

    Welcome and Official Opening

    8:30am-8:40am

    Welcome and Introductory Comments

    8:40am-8:50am

    Peter Betzer, Dean, College of Marine Science, USF

    8:50am-9:00am

    Jim Cato, Director, Florida Sea Grant Program

    9:00am-9:45am

    Sandy Shumway, Global Scallop Aquaculture - A Glance at the Past and a Gaze at the Future

    9:45am-10:00am

    Housekeeping Remarks

    10:00am-10:30am
    Return to Agenda Index

    Refreshment Break & Networking

    10:30am-Noon

    Session I – Aquaculture

    10:30am-10:40am

    Aquaculture
    Moderator: Esteban Fernando Felix-Pico, IPN-CICIMAR, La Paz, B.C.S., Mexico

    10:40am-11:00am

    Scallop Activity, A Measure of Vitality? [A part of the SCALQUAL, EU CRAFT project no. Q5CR 2000-70310] – Gyda Christophersen, Thorolf Magnesen and Guillermo Román

    11:00am-11:20am

    How Healthy Are Cultivated Scallops (Argopecten purpuratus) from Chile? – Karin B. Lohrmann and Catherine Cruz

    11:20am-11:40am

    Depuration Conditions for King Scallops (Pecten maximus) – William J. Doré and Ian Laing

    11:40am-1:30pm
    Return to Agenda Index

    Lunch on Own

    1:30pm-3:00pm

    Session II – Aquaculture

    1:30pm-1:40pm

    Aquaculture
    Moderator: Samia Sarkis, Bermuda Biological Station for Research Inc., Bermuda, Bermuda

    1:40pm-2:00pm Scallop Culture in China: Status and Challenges – Fusui Zhang

    2:00pm-2:20pm

    Demonstration of “Seafish” Hyperbooks on the Cultivation of Selected Marine Shellfish Species – Susan D. Utting, Craig Burton and Ian Laing

    2:20pm-2:40pm

    Farming the Sea Scallop, Placopecten magellanicus, in Atlantic Canada.  The Necessity for Time and Patience on the Farm, Not Just Research – Michael J. Dadswell

    2:40pm-3:00pm

    Identification of Commercially Viable Sea Scallop Spat Collection Sites in the Southern Gulf of St. Lawrence – Leslie-Anne Davidson, Monique Niles and G. Jay Parsons

    3:00pm-3:30pm
    Return to Agenda Index

    Refreshment Break and Networking

    3:30pm-5:00pm

    Session III – Fisheries

    3:30pm-3:40pm

    Fisheries
    Moderator: Sam Naidu, Fisheries and Oceans Canada, St. John's, NF, Canada

    3:40pm-4:00pm

    Forecasting the Scallop Spatfall Using Morphological Identification of Scallop Larvae – John Slater

    4:00pm-4:20pm

    Could Adding Scallop Shells to the Sea Bottom Increase the Production of Scallops and Other Commercially Important Species? – John H. Himmelman and Martin Guay

    4:20pm-4:40pm

    Forecasting the Future of the Queen Scallop Fishery in the Isle of Man – Belinda J. Vause, Bryce D. Beukers-Stewart, Matthew W. J. Mosley and Andrew R. Brand

    4:40pm-5:00pm

    Closing Remarks & Session Recap

    6:00pm-8:30pm
     

     

     

    Return to Agenda Index

    Welcoming Reception
     (at the St. Petersburg Pier Aquarium)

    Friday, April 25, 2003

    7:00am-5:00pm

    Registration Office Open

    7:30am-8:30am

    Early Morning Refreshments

    7:30am-5:00pm

    Posters on Display

    8:30am-10:00am

    Session IV – Fisheries

    8:30am-8:40am

    Fisheries
    Moderator: Mike Dredge, Aquaculture & Fisheries Development, Brisbane 4001, Queensland, Australia

    8:40am-9:00am

    The Effect of Ground Type on the Catchability of Scallops in Commercial Dredges – David W Palmer

    9:00am-9:20am

    Development and Characteristics of Butterfly Scallop Trawl – R. B. Lauzier and T. H. Richards

    9:20am-9:50am
    Return to Agenda Index

    Refreshment Break and Networking

    9:50am-11:30AM

    Session V – Fisheries

    9:50am-10:00am

    Fisheries
    Moderator: Sissel Andersen, Institute of Marine Research, Dept. of Aquaculture, Austevoll Aquaculture Research Station, Storebø, Norway

    10:00am-10:20am

    Using Spatial Closures to Maintain Saucer Scallop Broodstock and Population Levels - the Streaker’s Defence – Mike Dredge

    10:20am-10:40am

    Benefits of a Closed Area for Populations of Scallops, Pecten maximus, around the Isle of Man – Bryce D. Beukers-Stewart, Belinda J. Vause, Matthew W. J. Mosley and Andrew R. Brand

    10:40am-11:00am

    Progressing to a Scientifically-based Assessment and Management System for Pink and Spiny Scallops off the British Columbia Coast – R. B. Lauzier and E. Wylie

    11:00am-11:30am

    Group Discussion

    11:30am-1:30pm
    Return to Agenda Index

    Lunch on Own

    1:30pm-3:20pm

    Session VI – Fisheries

    1:30pm-1:40pm

    Fisheries
    Moderator: Neil Bourne, Retired Scientist, Nanaimo, BC, Canada

    1:40pm-2:00pm

    Long-term Trends in the U.S. Atlantic Sea Scallop (Placopecten magellanicus) Fishery – Deborah R. Hart and Paul J. Rago

    2:00pm-2:20pm

    Bay scallop, Argopecten irradians irradians, Restoration Efforts in the Northeastern United States – Ronald Goldberg and Steven T. Tettelbach

    2:20pm-2:40pm

    Bay Scallop (Argopecten irradians) Population Restoration in Florida: Field Planting Methods and Results – William S. Arnold, Melanie Parker, Sarah Peters and Melissa Harrison

    2:40pm-3:00pm

    Alternative Explanations for the Observed Resurgence of Bay Scallop (Argopecten irradians) Populations in Florida, USA Waters – William S. Arnold

    3:00pm-5:00pm

    Formal POSTER SESSION and Shell Display

    6:30pm

    Board Busses for OPTIONAL “Evening in Ybor City”

    7:30pm-10:30pm
    Return to Agenda Index

    Evening on Own in Ybor City

    Saturday, April 26, 2003

    7:00am-5:00pm

    Registration Office Open

    7:30am-8:30am

    Early Morning Refreshments

    7:30am-5:00pm

    Posters on Display

    8:10am-10:00am

    Session VII BIochemistry/Genetics

    8:10am-8:20am

    Biochemistry/Genetics
    Moderator: Marc Frischer, Skidaway Institute of Oceanography, Savannah, Georgia, USA

    8:20am-8:40am Genetic Improvement of Cultured Scallops in China – Guofan Zhang, Xiao Liu, Huaiping Zheng, Huayong Que, Fusui Zhang and Ximing Guo

    8:40am-9:00am

    Genetics of Scallops: Where Next? – Andy Beaumont

    9:00am-9:20am

    Biosynthesised Fatty Acids of Pectinids: Possible Phylogenetic Significance – Edouard Kraffe*, Philippe Soudant and Yanic Marty

    9:20am-9:40am

    Molecular Cloning and Expression of Vitellogenin from the Scallop, Patinopecten yessoensis (Bivalvia, Mollusca) – Makoto Osada, Akihiro Kijima and Masahiko Harata

    9:40am-10:00am

    Defining the Stock Structure of the Chilean Scallop Argopecten purpuratus (Lamark, 1819), and Investigating the Effects of the 1997-98 El Niño on Natural Populations Using Molecular Genetic Markers – Tom Pickerell*, Stewart McConnell and David O.F. Skibinski

    10:00am-10:30am
    Return to Agenda Index

    Refreshment Break and Networking

    10:30am-Noon

    Session VIII BIochemistry/Genetics
                                  &  Reproduction

    10:30am-10:40am

    Biochemistry/Genetics & Reproduction
    Moderator: Andy Beaumont, University of Wales - Bangor, Menai Bridge, Gwynedd, Wales, UK

    10:40am-11:00am

    A Genetic Probe for the Sea Scallop (Placopecten magellanicus): Molecular Approaches for Tracking Larval Dispersion – Marc E. Frischer, Jean M. Danforth, Roxanne M. Bower and William S. Arnold

    11:00am-11:20am

    Genes Involved with Growth and Development of the Bay Scallop, Argopecten irradiansSteven Roberts and Rick Goetz

    11:20am-11:40am

    The Reproductive Cycle of the Blotchy Scallop Spathochlamys vestalis (Reeve, 1853) at Isla Danzante, Baja California Sur, México – Marcial Villalejo Fuerte, Bertha Patricia Ceballos Vázquez, Federico García Domínguez, Esteban Fernando Félix-Pico and Marcial Arellano Martínez

    11:40am-Noon

    A Decadal Study on the Patterns of Spawning and Settlement of the Sea Scallop, Placopecten magellanicus, in the Bay of Fundy – Shawn M.C. Robinson and James D. Martin

    Noon-1:30pm
    Return to Agenda Index

    Lunch on Own

    1:30pm-3:00pm

    Session IX – Aquaculture

    1:30pm-1:40pm

    Aquaculture
    Moderator: Michael A. Moyer, Concordia University at Austin, Austin, Texas, USA

    1:40pm-2:00pm

    Growth and Retrieval of Postlarval Lion’s Paw Scallop Nodipecten nodosus in a Subtropical Environment: Influence of Environmental Factors and Size at Deployment – G. S. Rupp*, G. J. Parsons, R. J. Thompson and M. M. de Bem

    2:00pm-2:20pm

    Nursery Culture of Argopecten gibbus in Bermuda: A Short Investigation on Density Effects on Shell and Tissue Growth – S. Sarkis, M. Helm, C. Hohn and A. Cogswell

    2:20pm-2:40pm

    Substrate Effects on Survival, Growth and Dispersal of Juvenile Sea Scallop (Placopecten magellanicus, Gmelin) Seeded off Magdalen Islands (Québec, Canada) – J. C. Brêthes and M. G. Bourgeois*

    2:40pm-3:00pm

    Growth of Nodipecten subnodosus (Sowerby, 1835) in Suspended Culture in the Guerrero Negro Lagoon, Baja California Sur México – E. F. Félix-Pico, M. Arellano-Martínez, B.P. Ceballos-Vázquez, M. Armenta, P.M. Domínguez-Valdéz and A.M. García-Aguilar

    3:00pm-3:30pm
    Return to Agenda Index

    Refreshment Break and Networking

    3:30pm-5:00pm

    Session X – Aquaculture

    3:30pm-3:40pm

    Aquaculture
    Moderator: Gavin Burnell, University College Cork, Prospect Row, Cork, Ireland

    3:40pm-4:00pm

    Investigation of Starfish (Asterias vulgaris) Predatory Impact on Scallop Collector Bags – Madeleine Nadeau and Georges Cliche

    4:00pm-4:20pm

    Predation by the Ballan Wrasse (Labrus bergylta) on Scallops (Pecten maximus) Released in Bottom Culture – T. Strohmeier, Ø. Strand, E. Helland, T. Helland and G. Hamre

    4:20pm-4:40pm

    Fenced Farming - A Prerequisite for Scallop (Pecten maximus) Seabed Culture in Norway? – Øivind Strand, Ellen S. Grefsrud, Tore Strohmeier, Esben Helland, Trond Helland and Geir Hamre

    4:40pm-5:00pm

    Closing Remarks & Session Recap

    5:00pm
    Return to Agenda Index

    Evening/Dinner on Own

    Sunday, April 27, 2003

    7:00am-8:00am

    Morning Refreshments

    8:00am-5:00pm

    Field Trip to Homosassa Springs

    5:00pm-8:00pm

    BBQ Dinner in Homosassa Springs

    8:00pm
    Return to Agenda Index

    Board Busses for Return to Hotel (arrive at approximately 10:00pm)

    Monday, April 28, 2003

    8:00am-5:00pm

    Registration Office Open

    8:00am-8:30am

    Early Morning Refreshments

    8:00am-5:00pm

    Posters on Display

    8:50am-10:00am

    Session XI – Resource Management

    8:50am-9:00am

    Resource Management
    Moderator: Shawn Robinson, Dept. Fisheries & Oceans, St. Andrews, NB, Canada

    9:00am-9:20am

    1983-2002 : The 20-year Development of the King Scallop (Pecten maximus) Sea-Farming Industry in the Bay of Brest (France): Historical Record, Results, Prospect – Pierre-Gildas Fleury, Jean-Pierre Carval, Marie-Louise Muzellec, André Gérard, Jean Barret, Jean-Claude Cochard and Jean-Claude Dao

    9:20am-9:40am

    Is It Possible to Conserve Biomass For Future Exploitation? An Experience with  Argopecten purpuratus (Lamarck 1819) in the Management Area at Puerto Aldea, Chile – Wolfgang Stotz

    9:40am-10:00am

    Relationship between Body Component Indices and Recreational Harvest Season for Bay Scallops (Argopecten irradians) from Several Subpopulations in the NE Gulf of Mexico, USA – Stephen P. Geiger and William S. Arnold

    10:00am-10:30am
    Return to Agenda Index

    Refreshment Break and Networking

    10:30am-Noon

    Session XII – Resource Management

    10:30am-10:40am

    Resource Management
    Moderator: Guillermo Roman, Instituto Espanol de Oceanografφa, A Coruna, Spain

    10:40am-11:00am

    Managing Scallops along Florida’s West Coast: The Importance of Interactions among Scallop Biology, Habitat Availability, Recreational Fishing Effort, and Fisheries Management – Jaime M. Greenawalt, Thomas K. Frazer,Charles A. Jacoby and William S. Arnold

    11:00am-11:20am

    Broadscale Habitat Mapping of the Scallop Grounds off Northern Ireland – R. P. Briggs, M. Service and A. J. Mitchell

    11:20am-11:40am

    Effects of Substrate Availability and Characteristics on the Recruitment and Survival of Argopecten purpuratus (Lamarck 1819) – Aldo Pacheco* and Wolfgang Stotz

    11:40am-Noon

    Attachment of Juvenile Queen Scallops (Aequipecten opercularis) to Live Maerl and Other Substrata in Laboratory Conditions – Nicholas A. Kamenos* and P. Geoffrey Moore

    Noon-1:30pm

    Lunch on Own

    1:30pm-5:00pm
    Return to Agenda Index

    Removal of Posters and Pectinid Displays

    1:30pm-3:00pm

    Session XIII – Physiology

    1:30pm-1:40pm

    Physiology
    Moderator: Elisabeth von Brand, Universidad Católica del Norte, Coquimbo, Chile

    1:40pm-2:00pm

    Scaling of Metabolic Rate with Body Mass and Temperature in Scallops – Olaf Heilmayer and Thomas Brey

    2:00pm-2:20pm

    The Effect of Constant vs. Oscillating Temperature on the Energy Balance of Lion’s Paw Scallop Nodipecten subnodosus María Teresa Sicard*, Alfonso N. Maeda-Martínez, Armando López-Sánchez, Mauro Sicard-González, Jesús Bautista-Romero, José Luis Ramírez-Arce, Victor Ocaño-Higuera and Ana Isabel Beltrán

    2:20pm-2:40pm

    The Aerobic Scope of Iceland Scallops, Chlamys islandica, in Relation to Spawning – Helga Guderley, Simon-Pierre Gingras and John Himmelman

    2:40pm-3:00pm

    Comparative Studies of Feeding and Behaviour of Great Scallop (Pecten maximus L.) Larvae – S. Andersen, H. Browman, T. Haugen and A.B. Skiftesvik

    3:00pm-3:30pm
    Return to Agenda Index

    Refreshment Break and Networking

    3:30pm-5:00pm

    Session XIV – Physiology

    3:30pm-3:40pm

    Physiology
    Moderator: Bruce J. Barber, University of Maine, Orono, ME, USA

    3:40pm-4:00pm

    Effect of the Toxic Dinoflagellate, Karenia brevis, on Larval Mortality and Juvenile Feeding in the Bay Scallop, Argopecten irradians, from Florida – Jay R. Leverone*, Norman J. Blake and Sandra E. Shumway

    4:00pm-4:20pm

    Toxicity Effects of Acute Ammonia Exposure in the Scallop Pecten maximus (L.) – Peter F. Duncan, Alan C. Taylor and Peter Spencer Davies

    4:20pm-4:40pm

    Development of the Early Nervous System of the Scallop Amusium balloti (Bernardi, 1861) – Sizhong Wang*, Wayne Knibb, Peter F. Duncan and Bernard M. Degnan

    4:40pm-5:00pm

    Closing Remarks & Session Recap

    7:00pm
    Return to Agenda Index

    Closing Dinner Banquet at the St. Petersburg Hilton

    Tuesday, April 29, 2003

    8:00am-9:00am

    Morning Refreshments

    9:00am-11:00am

    Session XV – Economics

    9:00am-9:10am

    Economics
    Moderator: Chuck Adams, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA

    9:10am-9:30am

    Cham Scallop (Patinopecten yessoensis) Aquaculture in Korea – Jong Du Choi and Sherry L. Larkin

    9:30am-9:50am

    Productivity Changes Due to Area Closures in the Northwest Atlantic Sea Scallop Fishery – John B. Walden and Jim Kirkley

    9:50am-10:10am

    Managing Risk, Profits and Sustainability for ITQ Fisheries: A Bioeconomic Analysis of a Rotational Enhancement Scallop Fishery – Kathryn Lemieux* and Gilbert Sylvia

    10:10am-10:30am

    Closing Remarks & Session Recap

    10:30am-11:30am

    Business Meeting

    11:00am
    Return to Agenda Index

    Workshop Concludes

     

    Return to Main Index

    Poster Directory

    Aquaculture

    Recent Developments in Aquaculture Production of Great Scallop (Pecten maximus L.) Spat in Norway – S. Andersen, L. Torkildsen, T. Magnesen and H. Myrseth

    Preliminary Data on the Culture of Chlamys varia in Fuengirola, Málaga – Mª Jesús Campos and Juana Cano

    Interannual Variations in Pectinid Spat Collection in Fuengirola (Málaga, Spain), with Special Reference to Chlamys varia and Aequipecten opercularisJuana Cano and Mª Jesús Campos

    Evaluation of Genetic Lines of Bay Scallops for Grow-out, Overwintering Survival and Stock Enhancement – Joseph Choromanski and Sheila Stiles

    STUDENT - Functional Anatomy of Nodipecten nodosus (Linnaeus, 1758) (Bivalvia: Pectinidae), the First Pectinid Cultivated in Brazil – Maurício L. da Fonseca and Walter Narchi

    STUDENT -Settlement and Growth of Spat of the Black Scallop Chlamys varia in Hatchery Culture – Juan P. De la Roche, Angeles Louro and Guillermo Román

    STUDENT - Spawning Induction of the Queen Scallop Aequipecten opercularis in the Hatchery – Juan P. De la Roche, Angeles Louro and Guillermo Román

    STUDENT - The Use of ScallopBase for Predictions of Latitudinal Gradients – Olaf Heilmayer and Thomas Brey

    King Scallop Cultivation – Ian Laing

    Improving the Quality of Scallops to Ensure a Viable Aquaculture Production (SCALQUAL) [EU CRAFT project no. Q5CR 2000-70310] – Thorolf Magnesen and Gyda Christophersen

    Effect of Different Temperature Regimes on Reproductive Conditioning of Argopecten purpuratus Broodstock – gloria Martínez and Hernán Pérez

    Growth and Survival of the Tehuelche Scallop Aequipecten tehuelchus in Culture – Maite Andrea Narvarte

    Ultrastructural Comparation of Argopecten purpuratus, Aequipecten opercularis and Perapecten commutatus SPAT – Juan B. Peña and  C. Rodríguez-Babío

    Improvement of Settlement of Chilean Scallop Argopecten purpuratus (Lamarck, 1819) Using Biofilms – Carlos Riquelme S., Alejandro Rojas F. and Gustavo Valencia.

    Effect of Density and Handling on the Growth and Survival of Juvenile Pecten maximus in Suspended Culture in Ría de Arousa, NW Spain [A part of the SCALQUAL, EU CRAFT project no. Q5CR 2000-70310] – Guillermo Román, Angeles Louro and Gyda Christophersen

    Effect of Handling, Density and Cage Mesh Size on Survival and Growth of Juvenile Pecten maximus in Suspended Culture in South Spain [A part of the SCALQUAL, EU CRAFT project no. Q5CR 2000-70310] – Guillermo Román and Gyda Christophersen

    Effect of Stocking Density and Initial Size on Hatchery Produced Pecten maximus Spat Deployed to the Sea [A part of the SCALQUAL, EU CRAFT project no. Q5CR 2000-70310] – Guillermo Román, Angeles Louro and Gyda Christophersen

    STUDENT - Growth and Retrieval of Postlarval Lion’s Paw Scallop Nodipecten nodosus in a Subtropical Environment: Influence of Depth and Density – G. S. Rupp, G. J. Parsons, R. J. Thompson and M. M. de Bem

    Scallop Spat Production in Mesocosms Using Hatchery-Produced, Eyed-Scallop Larvae – J. Slater, M. Norman, R. Browne and I. Connellan

    Deleterious Effect of Diatoms of the Genus Rhizosolenia in Argopecten purpuratus in the Bays of Northern Chile – Eduardo Uribe

    Reproduction

    Reproductive Cycle of Lion-paw Nodipecten subnodosus in Laguna Ojo de Liebre, B. C. S., México – B. P. Ceballos-Vázquez, M. Arellano-Martínez, M. Villalejo-Fuerte, F. García-Domínguez and J. F. Elorduy-Garay

    The Utilization of Gonadic Histology and Gonadosomatic Indices in Assessing Reproductive Output in Cultured Argopecten gibbus Samia Sarkis and Andrew Cogswell

    Life in Cold Water: What Is the Price for Reproduction? A Scallop Example – Olaf Heilmayer

    The Use of Serotonin to Induce Spawning in Nodipecten nodosus (Linnaeus, 1758), a Brazilian Mollusc – Ana Cristina Pinto Reis, Erica Pauls, Carlos M.V. Cabezas and Marcos A.L. de Castro

    Frequency of Gonad Sampling and Gonad Index in Mulroy Bay 1993-2002 – John Slater

    Loss of Reproductive Potential in Cultured Argopecten purpuratus Populations in Tongoy Bay, Chile: Genetic or Environmental Factors? – Eduardo Uribe and Elisabeth von Brand

    Physiology

    Clearance Rate of Pecten maximus. I: Effect of Flow and Food Concentration – C. P. Acosta and J. Blanco

    Clearance Rate of Pecten maximus. II: Optimal Food Concentration – C. P. Acosta and J. Blanco

    Clearance Rate of Pecten maximus. III: Inter-Individual Variability – C. P. Acosta and J. Blanco

    Clearance Rate of Pecten maximus. IV: Effect of the Acclimation and Food Concentration – C. P. Acosta and J. Blanco

    Clearance Rate of Pecten maximus. V: Effect of Oxygen Supply, Size and Food Concentration – C. P. Acosta and J. Blanco

    STUDENT - Biochemical Composition In Nodipecten subnodosus Related To Reproduction And Food Availability – M. Arellano-Martínez, B. P. Ceballos-Vázquez, J. F. Elorduy-Garay and I. S. Racotta

    Warm Water Annual Checks In Weathervane Scallops Patinopecten caurinus? – Jeffrey P. Barnhart and Scott J. Carpenter

    Bay Scallop Bio-monitoring Sensor – Elizabeth C. Tyner, Norman J. Blake and Eric T. Steimle

    Effect of Salinity on the Distribution of Argopecten purpuratus on the SW Pacific Coast – E. Uribe, J. L. Blanco and C. Yamashiro

    Biochemisty/Genetics

    Presence of caudal Gene Homologs in Pecten maximusLuz Pérez-Parallé, Pablo Carpintero, Montserrat García-Lavandeira, José Luis Sánchez and Marcelina Abad

    Heterozygosity and Escape Response Capacity in the Scallop Argopecten purpuratusKatherina Brokordt, Miriam Fernandez and Federico Winkler

    STUDENT - Genetic Assessment of Sea Scallop, Placopecten magellanicus (Gmelin, 1791), Stock Structure in the Southern Gulf of Maine – Erin C. Fisher, Paul D. Rawson and Scott Feindel

    Evolutionary Relationships of Five Scallop Species Inferred from Ribosomal DNA Internal Transcribed Spacer Sequences – Ana Insua, María José López-Piñón, Ruth Freire and Josefina Méndez

    STUDENT - Determination of the Quality of the Lion’s Paw Scallop Nodipecten subnodosus Adductor Muscle after Exposure to Constant and Oscillating Temperatures – Victor Manuel Ocaño-Higuera, Ramón Pacheco-Aguilar, Maria Elena Lugo-Sánchez, Alfonso N. Maeda-Martínez, María Teresa Sicard, Armando López-Sánchez, Ana Isabel Beltrán and Ofelia Rouzaud-Sández

    Phylogenetic Relationships among Northern Atlantic and Southern Australasian Pecten Scallops Based on 16S Ribosomal DNA Gene Sequences – Carlos Saavedra and Juan B. Peña

    Phylogeography of Pecten maximus and P.jacobaeus Based on Sequences of the Mitochondrial 16S Ribosomal DNA and Cytochrome Oxidase I Genes – Carlos Saavedra and Juan B. Peña

    The Isolation of Three proboscipedia Gene Fragments from Pecten maximusLuz Pérez-Parallé, Pablo Carpintero, Marcelina Abad and José L. Sánchez

    Isolation and Cloning of a DNA Fragment Related to GnRH Receptor Gene in Pecten maximusC. Saout,
    A .J. Pazos, J. L. Sanchez, A. Donval
    and Y. M.Paulet

    STUDENT - ODH and LAP Polymorphisms and Morphological, Enzymatic and Behavioural Characteristics of the Giant Scallop (Placopecten magellanicus) – Helga Guderley, Isabelle Tremblay, Martin Lafrance and Réjean Tremblay

    Survival and Growth of Hybrids between Two Different Stocks of Bay Scallop Argopecten irradians irradians (Lamarck 1819) – Guofan Zhang, Huaiping Zheng, Xiao Liu and Ximing Guo

    Fisheries

    STUDENT - Development of a New Scallop Zygochlamys patagonica Fishery in Uruguay: Latitudinal and Bathymetric Patterns in Biomass and Population Structure – Nicolás Gutiérrez and Omar Defeo

    El Niño Impact on the Peruvian Scallop (Argopecten purpuratus) Production in Independencia Bay, Peru – Jaime Mendo and Matthias Wolff

    Predation of Scallops by American Plaice and Yellowtail Flounder – K. S. Naidu

    Morphometric Analysis of Pectinids on the Isthmus of Panama – Janzel R. Villalaz G., Carlos Vega and Juan A. Gómez H.

    Resource Management

    Scallop-Holothurian Relationship in the Middle-Deep (100m) Argentinian Shelf (Zygochlamys patagonica and Psolus patagonicus) – Pablo E. Penchaszadeh and Juliana Giménez

    A New Law Ensuring Property Rights in Scallop Sea Ranching in Norway – Øivind Strand, Tore Strohmeier, Stein Mortensen, Knut Jørstad, Ellen S. Grefsrud, Ann-Lisbeth Agnalt and Terje Svåsand

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    Field Trip to Homosassa Springs

    manateefish.jpg (124925 bytes) Our conference agenda includes a one-day field trip to Homosassa Springs, situated along Florida's west-central coast and the Gulf of Mexico. We will see Florida's tropical environment, view manatees in their natural habitat and experience a pontoon boat tour of the Homosassa River and surrounding Florida marshes. Lunch and refreshments will be provided during our early afternoon excursion, and later on we will enjoy a Florida-style barbecue dinner with local entertainment.

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    Optional Evening in Ybor City
    (Saturday, April 26, 2003)

    Ybor City is one of only three National Historic Landmark Districts located in the State of Florida. Cobblestone streets and huge old cigar factory buildings make up this historic and legendary town. Founded in 1886 by Vicente Martinez Ybor, Ybor City became "the cigar capital of the world" by 1900. Factories were staffed mostly by Cuban cigar makers, and as well as Italians and Spaniards. By the early 1950's the cigar factories were gone.

    Ybor was revitalized in the late 1990's and now attracts large numbers of visitors due to the wide variety of shops, restaurants, clubs and galleries.

    You are invited to experience the cultural & historical sights, shops, restaurants, events and nightlife that Ybor City has to offer in a unique way. Whether you are a history buff, cigar aficionado or simply looking for "Florida's Latin Quarter Experience”, there is much enjoyment in store at Ybor City.

    You’ll Experience:

    Round-trip group bus transportation will be provided into the city departing the St. Petersburg Hilton at 6:30pm. A return bus shuttle will take you back to the hotel up until 12midnight. Sign up for this event on the registration form if you wish to participate. A nominal fee applies.

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    Registration Information

    What Does the Registration Fee Include? 
    The registration fee, combined with funds contributed by our generous sponsors, will allow each registrant to receive one copy of the abstract book, conference materials including a canvas tote bag, a long-sleeved denim shirt and full participation in the Sunday Field Trip to Homosassa Springs which includes lunch, refreshments and a barbecue dinner. The registration fee also includes deluxe hors d’oeuvres and refreshments at the Wednesday Welcome Social, the Thursday Reception at the St. Petersburg Pier Aquarium and participants will enjoy a light continental breakfast, as well as morning and afternoon refreshment breaks each day. The guest and child registration fee includes full attendance at all conference meal functions, and guests may participate in the Field Tour. (Guests will not receive a copy of the abstract book.)

    Registration Fees All figures are presented in US dollars.
    Early Registration
    (Before February 1, 2003)
    Workshop Attendees......................
    Student Attendees...........................
    Spouses/Guests..............................
    Children (12 & under).....................
    Optional "Evening in Yabor City".....
    $ 295
    $ 195
    $ 195
    $ 125
        $ 5
    Regular Registration
    (By March 1, 2003)
    Workshop Attendees......................
    Student Attendees...........................
    Spouses/Guests..............................
    Children (12 & under).....................
    Optional "Evening in Yabor City".....
    $ 345
    $ 250
    $ 250
    $ 175
      $ 10
    Late/On-Site Registration
    (After March 1, 2003)
    Workshop Attendees......................
    Student Attendees...........................
    Spouses/Guests..............................
    Children (12 & under).................... 
    Optional "Evening in Yabor City".....
    $ 395
    $ 300
    $ 300
    $ 225
      $ 10
    OPTIONAL “Evening in Ybor City” - Saturday, April 26, 2003
    Includes: Round-trip bus transportation (departing from the hotel).
    (Participants are on their own for dinner, shopping and entertainment.)

     

    We are delighted you wish to register for the Pectinid Workshop. While Advance Registration is closed, we will be happy to register you onsite at the conference, and look forward to your participation. Thank you.

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    Call for Abstracts - the deadline to submit an abstract has been extended to January 1, 2003.

    All individuals involved with Pectinids are strongly encouraged to submit an abstract for consideration as an oral or poster presentation at the workshop. ALL abstracts, both oral and poster, will be published in the book of abstracts. 

    All student presentations, both oral and poster, will be entered into the Student Presentation Competition. (Student must be  the senior author and presenter.)

    If you wish to make an oral or poster presentation, please submit an abstract no later than January 1, 2003. Abstracts MUST be submitted electronically following the detailed format specifications provided via the link below. 
     

    CLICK HERE for abstract preparation 
    and online submission instructions. 

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    Workshop Sponsors (Click on logos or highlighted text to visit sponsor web sites)

    National

    Connecticut

    Florida

    Maine

    New York

    North Carolina

    Rhode Island

    South Carolina

     
    St. Petersburg Shell Club, Inc.
     

    We kindly acknowledge Ms. Carole P. Marshall
    for organizing the shell display.

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    Host Hotel Information

    skyway.jpg (67034 bytes)
    Hilton St. Petersburg
    333 First Street South
    St. Petersburg, Florida 33701-4342
    Phone: 1-727-894-5000
    Fax: 1-727-823-4797

    The Workshop will be held at the Hilton St. Petersburg located in downtown St. Petersburg across from the Al Lang Stadium and Bayfront Performing Arts Center. Convenient to Interstate 275, the hotel is just 15 minutes from the St. Petersburg/Clearwater Airport and a half-hour from Tampa International Airport.

    The St. Petersburg Hilton is offering participants of the 14th International Pectinid Workshop a special guest room rate of $85.00 plus 11% tax with one or two people in a room and $95.00 with three or four people in a room. The group rate will be honored three days prior and three days following the conference, based on availability. Contact the hotel at 1-888-843-6929 or contact the National Reservations Office at 1-800-HILTONS. Be sure to identify yourself as being with the International Pectinid Workshop when you make your reservation.

    All reservation requests will require a guarantee with a credit card or a one (1) night advance payment on or before March 15, 2003. This advance payment is non-refundable if the guest does not arrive as scheduled, or changes or cancels the reservation less than 48 hours prior to arrival.

    After March 15, guest rooms for Pectinid participants will no longer be on hold and the discounted group rate may not be available.

    Please Note: As this is a discounted group rate, it is not commissonable to travel agents.

    If you prefer to make your reservation by mail or fax., you may click the link below for a printable PDF file that can be completed and returned to the Hotel.

    Hotel Reservation Form

    Note: You need Adobe Acrobat Reader installed to open and print the PDF file. (Available for free download.)

     
    Share-a-room Information
    Click Here to view MALES wishing to share a hotel room.

    Click Here to view FEMALES wishing to share a hotel room.
    (none currently available - sign up below to add your information.)
    Click here to submit your information for posting on the share a hotel room page (Email submissions will be posted within 3 working days).
    • This service will require that your name, gender, email address, affiliation, originating country and smoking preference be posted on a web page accessible to the public.
    • After locating a roommate, be sure to reserve your hotel room specifying two double beds as soon as possible. Double rooms tend to fill first and may not be available if you wait.

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    About St. Petersburg, Florida

    AERIAL1.jpg (289561 bytes) From the sparkling blue waters of a modern downtown waterfront to sunsets on the Gulf beaches only a 10-minute ride from downtown, St. Petersburg offers visitors an exciting variety of things to do and places to go. St. Petersburg is the 4th largest city in Florida and has a population of 251,000. Affectionately know as St. Pete, the city has an average temperature of 73.7 degrees and averages sunshine 361 days a year. That's why they call it the Sunshine State! And with a 234-mile shoreline along Tampa Bay, Boca Ciega Bay and the Gulf of Mexico Intracoastal Waterway, the view is breathtaking.

    A growing economy, a new Major League Baseball team, year-round sunshine, more than 100 lush green parks, boating, fishing, sailing venues, and modern entertainment facilities make St. Petersburg an excellent place to visit.

    The Hilton St. Petersburg, our host hotel and meeting facility, is within walking distance of The Pier Aquarium and the Bay Front Center where you can see numerous musical and entertainment performances. A Courtesy Bus will take you from the hotel to the Museum of the Fine Arts, the Salvador Dali Museum and the Great Exploration Museum where you are sure to enjoy their cultural entertainment.

    BBALL.jpg (247281 bytes) If you enjoy professional baseball, you can walk across the street from the hotel and watch the Tampa Bay Devil Rays in Spring Training at Al Lang Stadium or visit TROPICANA FIELD in St. Petersburg and watch them play a nationally televised game.

    For more information on the St. Petersburg area, check out these sites!
     

    THE PIER

    The Pier in St. Petersburg is an unique piece of Florida architecture that offers visitors a chance to experience the waterfront in the Tampa Bay area. Situated at the end of a mile long approach, this five story inverted pyramid features shops, restaurants, it's own aquarium, live music and even boat docks. The very top floor of The Pier combines both the tropical dining of Cha Cha Coconuts with a huge observation deck, giving the visitor a truly unique observation point on the Tampa Bay area. The Columbia Restaurant, also located in the Pier, has been serving Spanish cuisine since 1905. World famous for its fantastic paella, black bean soup and the best Cuban bread this side of Havana, The Columbia will be catering our Thursday evening Welcome Reception at The Pier. Plus, they are open daily for lunch and dinner so you will surely want to visit them for lunch one afternoon during the Workshop. A trolley service links The Pier to the St. Pete Hilton as well as the rest of downtown.

    OTHER AREA ATTRACTIONS


              Cultural Attractions


    Florida International
    Museum

    Salvador Dali Museum

    Museum of Fine Arts

              Golf Course Directories

    GOLF.jpg (325835 bytes)

              Air Transportation

              Rental Car

    Avis is offering special rental 
    rates to Pectinid Workshop
    Attendees. Click here to 
    make reservations.

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    Related Sites of Interest
     

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    Organizing Committee
    Norm Blake, Co-Chair
        and Conference Organizer
    University of South Florida
    College of Marine Science
    140 Seventh Avenue South
    St. Petersburg, FL 33701
    PHONE: 727-553-1521 / FAX: 727-553-1189
    E-mail: nblake@marine.usf.edu

    Don Sweat, Co-Chair
    Florida Sea Grant Extension Program

    830 First Street South
    St. Petersburg, Fla. 33701
    PHONE: 727-553-3399 / FAX: 727-553-1109
    E-mail: dsweat@seas.marine.usf.edu

    Beth Miller-Tipton, 
    Conference Coordinator
    Office of Conferences and Institutes (OCI)
    University of Florida / IFAS
    PO Box 110750
    Building 639, Mowry Road
    Gainesville, FL 32611-0750
    PHONE: 352-392-5930 / FAX: 352-392-4044
    E-mail: bmiller-tipton@mail.ifas.ufl.edu

    smpectinid02.jpg (1490824 bytes)

    Chuck Adams
    University of Florida / IFAS
    Food and Resource Economics Department
    Florida Sea Grant College Program
    PO Box 110240
    Gainesville, FL 3261-0240
    PHONE: 352-392-1826 ext 223 / FAX: 352-392-3646
    E-mail: cmadams@mail.ifas.ufl.edu

    Bill Arnold
    Florida Marine Research Institute
    100 Eighth Avenue SE
    St. Petersburg, FL 33701-5095
    PHONE: 727-896-8626 / FAX: 727-893-1374
    E-mail: bill.arnold@fwc.state.fl.us

    Sandy Shumway
    Dept. of Marine Sciences
    University of Connecticut
    1080 Shennecossett Road
    Groton, CT 06340
    PHONE: 860-405-9152 / FAX: 860-405-9153
    E-mail: sandrashumway@hotmail.com

    RUIN.jpg (280841 bytes)

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