4th International Bemisia Workshop
December 3-6, 2006

– and –

International Whitefly Genomics Workshop
December 7-8, 2006


Hawk's Cay Resort l Duck Key, Florida USA


SITE INDEX

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Bemisia Workshop Information

        Workshop Abstract Book (PDF format)

|

Group Photo from Bemisia Workshop

Bemisia Workshop Abstracts to be Published  in Journal of Insect Science
AND Coming Soon...Bemisia 2006: THE BOOK

l Objective & Overview l Call for Abstracts l Abstracts to Be Published
l Structure l Final Program Agenda l Bemisia 2006: The BOOK
l Who Should Attend l Speaker Instructions l Field Trip Information
l Why Should You Attend l Poster Directory l Organizing Committee
l Programmatic Topics l Poster Presenter Instructions  
l REGISTRATION INFORMATION
Whitefly Genomics Workshop Information

Group Photo from Whitefly Genomics Workshop

International Whitefly Genomics Workshop to Produce Whitepaper!
l Objective & Overview l Why Should You Attend l White Paper
l Structure l Benefits of Attending l Organizing Committee
l Who Should Attend l Program Agenda  
l REGISTRATION INFORMATION
General Information for Both Workshops
l Sponsor Opportunities & Recognition l Hotel & Meeting Site l Travel Information
l Area Information l Related Links l For More Information
l Share-a-ride information           |           l Share-a-room information
l REGISTRATION INFORMATION

4th International Bemisia Workshop
December 3-6, 2006

Bemisia Workshop Objective & Overview


Tomato Irregular Ripening Disorder

The University of Florida/IFAS and the United States Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service will organize the 4th International Bemisia Workshop. The objectives of this workshop are multifaceted. First and foremost is to maintain the established global forum for sharing information and progress on research and management of Bemisia spp. and the viruses they transmit. The workshop will provide a framework to promote teamwork between private and public sector scientists in conducting research and in technology development so as to maximize synergy and minimize duplication of effort. The workshop forum will allow participants to review advances, review and recommend research priorities, develop strategies for accelerating work, and provide guidance for future efforts. The workshop will foster national and international networking to achieve these goals and we invite you to attend.

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Bemisia Workshop Structure


Bean Golden Mosaic Virus

Invited and volunteer speakers will address programmatic topics over the course of the symposium during plenary sessions. The workshop will consist of keynote presentations by recognized authorities in each of the subject areas with plenty of time for shorter presentations.  Poster presentations are welcome and everyone will have opportunity to present their findings. Adequate time will also be allotted for interaction during Q&A, topical discussion periods and during many networking functions.

 

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Who Should Attend the Bemisia Workshop?


Tomato Yellow Leaf Curl Virus

Participation will be open to all those interested in addressing the problems caused by Bemisia spp and the challenges faced in controlling this world wide pest. Workshop participants will come from: 

  • University, government and private research institutions

  • Federal, state and regional regulatory agencies

  • The agrochemical industry

  • Growers and other interested parties

 

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Why Should You Attend the Bemisia Workshop?


Internal TIR Symptoms

With the recent detection of the "Q" biotype (Dec 2004) in the United States discussion of this and other biotypes, some of which may be very difficult to control with key insecticides, will
be very timely. The workshop will provide the opportunity for workers from around the world to share experiences, from the basic to the applied. The value of the Bemisia Workshop will be enhanced for many workers by the association with the Whitefly Genomics Workshop described below.

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Bemisia Workshop Programmatic Topics


Squash Silverleaf Disorder

Biology and Ecology

Life history

Behavior

Population dynamics

Sampling

Session Leaders:

  Steve Naranjo
 
Email: SNaranjo@wcrl.ars.usda.gov

  James Legg
 
Email: j.legg@cgiar.org

 

Damage Potential and Vector Relations

Epidemiology of whitefly borne viruses    

-Virus Movement and host determinants

-Virus transmission

-Virus-vector relationships

Emerging viruses

Plant resistance

Disease and damage expression

Plant disorders

Session Leaders:

  Jane Polston
 
Email: jep@ufl.edu

   Moshe Lapidot

  Email: lapidotm@volcani.agri.gov.il

 

Chemical Control and Resistance Management

Susceptibility and tolerance among populations

Strategies for impeding selection for resistance

Mode of action and selectivity

Integration with other management practices

Session Leaders:

  Rami Horowitz
 
Email: hrami@agri.gov.il

  Tim Dennehy
 
Email: tdennehy@Ag.arizona.edu

 

IPM and Biological Control


Eretmocerus mundus
Credit: Koppert Biological Systems

Conservation and augmentative biological control

New biological control agents

Other non-chemical control methods

-Plant resistance

-Insect netting and UV absorbing plastics

Session Leaders:

  Dan Gerling

  Email: dangr@post.tau.ac.il

  Jesusa (Susie) C. Legaspi
  Email: jlegaspi@saa.ars.usda.gov

 

Biotypes and Genomics

Systematics

Geographic ranges and distribution of biotypes

Biological distinctions

Methodology for characterization and identification

Session Leaders:

  Judy Brown
 
Email: jbrown@Ag.arizona.edu

  Bob Shatters
 
Email: rshatters@saa.ars.usda.gov

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Call for Abstracts

Individuals conducting research on all aspects related to Bemisia are strongly encouraged to submit an abstract representing an oral or poster presentation. Some oral presentations will be chosen from submitted abstracts by session chairs based on relationship to programmatic topics. Those not selected for oral presentation are encouraged to present their work in poster format. ALL abstracts, both oral and poster, will be published in the book of abstracts and will also be posted on the Bemisia website following the conference.

If you wish to make an oral presentation or present a poster, please submit an abstract no later than September 4, 2006. Abstracts MUST be submitted ONLINE via this web site. Notification of oral/poster format selection will be provided by September 27, 2006.
 

The abstract submission deadline has passed.

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Bemisia Workshop Final Program Agenda 

Printable Final Program Agenda (PDF format)

Workshop Abstract Book (PDF format)


Sunday
, December 3, 2006 (Pre-Workshop)

5:00pm–8:00pm

Registration Office Open

5:00pm–8:00pm

Early Bird Social & Poster Presenters Set-up Displays

 

Monday, December 4, 2006 (Day I)

8:00am–5:10pm

Registration Office Open

8:00am–9:30am

Early Morning Refreshments

9:00am–9:15am

Official Workshop Opening — Phil Stansly, Professor of Entomology, University of Florida/IFAS, Southwest Florida Research and Education Center (SWFREC), Immokalee, FL, USA – and – Cindy McKenzie, Research Entomologist, USDA-ARS, US Horticultural Research Laboratory, Fort Pierce, FL, USA

9:15am–9:30am

University of Florida Welcome — Mark R. McLellan – Dean for Research, University of Florida/IFAS, Gainesville, FL, USA

9:30am–9:45am

USDA WelcomeCalvin Arnold, Laboratory Director, USDA-ARS, US Horticultural Research Laboratory, Fort Pierce, FL, USA

9:45am–10:30am

Bemisia Research: Past, Present & Future Dan Gerling, Professor, Department of Zoology, Tel Aviv University, Ramat Aviv, Israel – and Paul De Barro, Stream Leader, Preparedness, CSIRO Entomology, Queensland, Australia

10:30am–11:15am

Invasion and Response: Impacts of Bemisia on Worldwide Agriculture Lance S. Osborne, Associate Center Director, Professor, IPM-Biological Control of Insects & Mites, Mid-Florida Research & Education Center, Apopka, FL, USA

11:15am–11:45am

US Actions – Osama A El-Lissy, Director, USDA-APHIS-PPQ, Riverdale, MD, USA

11:45am–12 noon

Sponsor Recognition and Housekeeping Remarks

12noon–1:30pm

Group Luncheon

1:30pm–3:10pm

SESSION I– Biotypes and Genomics

MODERATOR: Judith K. Brown, Professor, Department of Plant Sciences, The University of Arizona, Department of Plant Sciences, Tucson, AZ, USA

1:30pm–1:40pm

Opening Remarks and Session Overview by Moderator

1:40pm–2:10pm

Can Molecules Solve the Bemisia Conundrum When Morphology Cannot? A Taxonomist’s Perspective — Raymond J. Gill, Insect Biosystematist, Emeritus-California Dept. Food and Agriculture, Sacramento, CA, USA

2:10pm–2:30pm

Limited but Persistent Genetic Differentiation Among Biotype Q of Bemisia tabaci, the Only Biotype Detected in Protected Crops in Southern France A. Dalmon1, F. Halkett2, M. Granier2, and M. Peterschmitt2; 1 INRA-LNPV, Plant Pathology Department, Montfavet, France; 2 CIRAD, UMR BGPI, Montpellier, France

2:30pm–2:50pm

Characterization and Distribution of the Biotypes of the Whitefly Bemisia tabaci in Japan by Mitochondrial Cytochrome Oxidase I Sequence Analysis — Shigenori Ueda1, Toshio Kitamura2, Ken-ichiro Honda2, and Kenkichi Kanmiya3. 1National Agricultural Research Center for Kyushu Okinawa Region, National Agriculture and Food Research Organization, Kumamoto, Japan; 2National Institute of Vegetable and Tea Science, National Agriculture and Food Research Organization, Mie, Japan; 3Kurume University, School of Medicine, Fukuoka, Japan

2:50pm–3:10pm

Population Genetics of Bemisia tabaci Biotypes B and Q from the Mediterranean and the U.S. Inferred Using Microsatellite MarkersRobert G. Shatters, Jr.1, L.M. Boykin1, R.A. Bagnall2, R.C. Rosell2, D.R. Frohlich2, C.L. McKenzie1. 1Subtropical Insects Research Unit, U. S. Horticultural Research Laboratory, ARS, USDA, Fort Pierce, FL, USA; 2Biology Department, University of St. Thomas, Houston, TX, USA

3:10pm–3:30pm

Refreshment Break and Networking

3:30pm–5:10pm

Session I continued – Biotypes and Genomics

MODERATOR: Robert G. Shatters, Jr., Research Molecular Biologist, USDA-ARS, US Horticultural Research Laboratory, Fort Pierce, FL, USA

3:30pm–3:50pm

Cytoplasmic Incompatibility Phenotypes from Reciprocal Crosses of Three Biotypes of the Bemisia Tabaci Complex are Associated with Cardinium (Bacteroidetes) and Wolbachia, and Apparent Partial Rescue of CI Yielding Sex Bias — J.K. Brown1 and Rafael De J Caballero1,2  1Department of Plant Sciences and 2Department of Entomology, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, USA

3:50pm–4:10pm

Gene Expression in Pyriproxyfen Resistant Bemisia tabaci Q Biotype — Murad Ghanim and Svetlana Kontsedalov, Institute of Plant protection, Department of Entomology, the Volcani Center, Bet Dagan, Israel

4:10pm–4:30pm

The Involvement of Glutathione S-Tranferases from Bemisia tabaci (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) in Plant-Insect Interactions — Shai Morin1, Fishel Alon1, and Michal Alon1. 1Department of Entomology, the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Faculty of Agricultural, Food and Environmental Quality Sciences, Rehovot, Israel

4:30pm–4:50pm

Analysis of Bemisia tabaci Gene Expression Using Drosophila Microarrays — Henryk Czosnek1, Murad Ghanim2 1Faculty of Agriculture, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Rehovot, Israel 2 Institute of Plant protection, Department of Entomology, the Volcani Center, Bet Dagan, Israel

4:50pm–5:10pm

Session Recap and GROUP DISCUSSION

7:00pm–10:00pm

WELCOME RECEPTION - POOLSIDE

 

Tuesday, December 5, 2006 (Day II)

7:30am–5:10pm

Registration Office Open

7:30am–8:30am

Early Morning Refreshments

7:30am–5:00pm

Posters on Display

8:30am–10:10am

SESSION II – Biology & Ecology

MODERATOR: Steven E. Naranjo, Research Entomologist, USDA-ARS, Arid-Land Agricultural Research Center, Maricopa, AZ, USA

8:30am–8:35am

Opening Remarks and Session Overview by Moderator

8:35am–8:55am

The Inside Story: Bacteriocyte-Associated Endosymbionts of Whiteflies — Rosemarie C. Rosell, University of St. Thomas, Houston, TX, USA

8:55am–9:15am

Ultrastructural Characteristics of Bemisia Adult and Nymph Feeding — Thomas P. Freeman1, James S. Buckner2, Chang C. Chu3, Scott A. Payne1, and Jayma A. Moore1, 1Electron Microscopy Center, North Dakota State University, Fargo, North Dakota, USA, 2Biosciences Research Laboratory, USDA-ARS, Fargo, North Dakota, USA, 3USDA-ARS, Arid-Land Agricultural Research Center, Maricopa, Arizona, USA

9:15am–9:35am

Dynamics of Digestive Enzymes of Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) B-Biotype and Trialeurodes vaporariorum (Westwood) During Plant Species Switching — Fang-Hao Wan1,2, Gui-Fen Zhang1,2 and Fang Lei1, 1State Key Laboratory for Biology of Plant Diseases and Insect Pests, Institute of Plant Protection, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Beijing, China, 2Center for Management of Invasive Alien Species, Ministry of Agriculture, Beijing, China

9:35am–9:55am

A Comparative Study on Mating Behavior between the B Biotype and a Non-B Biotype of Bemisia tabaci from Zhejiang, China — Lian-Sheng Zang1,2 and Shu-Sheng Liu1, 1Institute of Insect Science, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, China, 2College of Agriculture, Jilin Agricultural University, Jilin, China

9:55am–10:15am

Refreshment Break and Networking

10:15am–12:10pm

SESSION II continued - Biology & Ecology

MODERATOR: James Legg, Vector Entomologist, IITA, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania

10:15am - 10:35am

Nutritional Factors Influencing Whitefly Development and Flight Behavior: the Search for a Suitable Bioassay to Test Hypotheses — Jackie L. Blackmer and Linda L. Lee, USDA-ARS, Arid-Land Agricultural Research Center, Maricopa, Arizona, USA

10:35am–10:55am

Bemisia tabaci, a Top 100 Invader — Paul De Barro, CSIRO Entomology, Queensland, Australia

10:55am–11:15am

Mortality Factors Affecting Populations of Bemisia tabaci on Cassava in Uganda — Peter Asiimwe1,2, Justin Ecaat1, Michael Otim2, Dan Gerling3, Moshe Guershon3, Samuel Kyamanywa2 and James P. Legg4,5, 1International Institute of Tropical Agriculture-Uganda, Kampala, Uganda, 2Makerere University, Kampala, Uganda, 3Tel Aviv University, Ramat Aviv, Israel, 4International Institute of Tropical Agriculture-Tanzania, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, 5Natural Resources Institute, University of Greenwich, Chatham Maritime, Kent, UK

11:15am–11:35am

Mortality and Population Dynamics of Bemisia tabaci within a Multi-Crop System — Steven E. Naranjo1, Peter C. Ellsworth2 and Luis Cañas3, 1USDA-ARS, Arid-Land Agricultural Research Center, Maricopa, Arizona, USA, 2Department of Entomology, University of Arizona, Maricopa Agricultural Center, Maricopa, Arizona, USA, 3Department of Entomology, Ohio State University, OARDC, Wooster, Ohio, USA

11:35am–11:55am

Changes in the Biology of Bemisia tabaci on Cassava in Africa and Their Impact on Virus Disease Pandemics — James P. Legg1,2, Peter Asiimwe3, Peter Sseruwagi4 and Judith K. Brown5, 1International Institute of Tropical Agriculture-Tanzania, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, 2Natural Resources Institute, Chatham Maritime, Kent, UK, 3International Institute of Tropical Agriculture-Uganda, Kampala, Uganda, 4Kawanda Agricultural Research Institute, Kampala, Uganda, 5University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona, USA

11:55am–12:10pm

Session Recap and GROUP DISCUSSION

12:10pm–1:20pm

Group Luncheon

1:20pm–3:10pm

SESSION III –Damage Potential & Vector Relations

MODERATOR: Moshe Lapidot, Plant Virologist, Volcani Center, ARO Institute of Plant Sciences, Bet Dagan, Israel

1:20pm–1:30pm

Opening Remarks and Session Overview by Moderator

1:30pm–1:50pm

Vector Specificity of Criniviruses in Tomato and Virus Competitiveness During Mixed Infection — W. M. Wintermantel, USDA-ARS, Salinas, CA, USA

1:50pm–2:10pm

Whitefly (Bemisia tabaci) Transmitted Squash Vein Yellowing Virus (SqVYV): A Component of Watermelon Vine Decline in South Florida — Pamela D. Roberts1, Philip A. Stansly2, Scott Adkins3, Susan Webb4, Carlye Baker5, Benny Bruton6, Rosa Muchovej1, Diann Achor7, C.S. Kousik8, Alicia L. Whidden9, Gene McAvoy10, and Phyllis Gilreath11. 1University of Florida, Department of Plant Pathology, SWFREC, Immokalee, FL, USA; 2University of Florida, Department of Entomology & Nematology, Immokalee, FL, USA; 3United States Department of Agriculture-ARS, USHRL, Fort Pierce, FL, USA. 4 University of Florida, Department of Entomology & Nematology, Gainesville, FL, USA; 5 Florida Department of Agriculture, Division of Plant Industry, Gainesville, FL, USA; 6 United States Department of Agriculture-ARS, Lane, Oklahoma, USA. 7 University of Florida, CREC, Lake Alfred, FL, USA;  8 US Vegetable Lab, USDA, Charleston, SC, USA; 9 University of Florida/IFAS, Hillsborough County Extension Service, Seffner, FL, USA; 10University of Florida/IFAS, Hendry County Extension Service, LaBelle, FL, USA; 11University of Florida/IFAS, Manatee County Extension Service, Palmetto, FL,USA

2:10pm–2:30pm

Squash Vein Yellowing Virus, a Novel Ipomovirus, Isolated from Squash and Watermelon in Florida — Scott Adkins1, Susan E. Webb2, Diann Achor3, Chandrasekar S. Kousik4, Pamela D. Roberts5, and  Carlye A. Baker6; USDA-ARS, 1Fort Pierce, FL and 4Charleston, SC; University of Florida, 2Gainesville, 3Lake Alfred, and 5Immokalee, FL; and 6FDACS-DPI, Gainesville, FL

2:30pm–2:50pm

The Effect of Begomoviruses on Whitefly Fitness — J. E. Polston1 and M. Toapanta2; 1Department of Plant Pathology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL and 2 Bayer Cropscience, Tampa, FL

2:50pm–3:10pm

Tomato Plants and Whitefly Interactions: Can It Be a Love Story? — M. Lapidot1 and D. Levy2. 1Institute of Plant Sciences, Volcani Center, ARO, Bet Dagan, Israel; 2Hazera Genetics, Mivhor, Israel

3:10pm–3:30pm

Refreshment Break and Networking

3:30pm–5:10pm

SESSION III continued – Damage Potential & Vector Relations

MODERATOR: Jane E. Polston, Professor, Department of Plant Pathology, University of Florida/IFAS, Gainesville, FL, USA

3:30pm–3:50pm

Squash Leaf Curl Virus Localizes in Primary Salivary Gland Compartments, and at Midgut and Filter Chamber Brush Border Cells In Viruliferous Bemisia tabaci — J. M. Cicero and J. K. Brown, Department of Plant Sciences, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, USA

3:50pm–4:10pm

Determining the Role of Ethylene Biosynthesis in the Development of Tomato Irregular Ripening Disorder Using Microarray Technology and rt-Real Time PCR — C. L. McKenzie1, X. H. Sinisterra1, J. P. Albano1, C. A. Powell2, Scot E. Dowd3, R. G. Shatters, Jr. 11Subtropical Insect Research Unit, U. S. Horticultural Research Laboratory, USDA-ARS, Fort Pierce, FL, USA; 2 Indian River Research and Education Center, IFAS, University of Florida, Fort Pierce, FL, USA; 3Livestock Issues Research Unit, USDA-ARS, Lubbock, TX, USA

4:10pm–4:30pm

Association of the ‘Distortion-Recovery Phenotype’ in ‘Anaheim’ Pepper Systemically Infected With the Non-Whitefly Transmissible PepGMV-Distortion Strain (Di), With the BC1/Promoter Region — A. M. Idris and J. K. Brown, Department of Plant Sciences, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, USA

4:30pm–4:50pm

Identification of Bemisia argentifolii Resistant Loci from Solanum habrochaites Accession LA1777 Aliya Momotaz, Jay W. Scott and David J. Schuster, Gulf Coast Research and Education Center, IFAS, University of Florida, Wimauma, FL, USA

4:50pm–5:10pm Making a Friend from a Foe: Expressing a GroEL Gene from the Whitefly Bemisia tabaci in the Phloem of Tomato Plants Confers Resistance to Tomato Yellow Leaf Curl Virus F. Akad1, A. Eybishtz1, D. Edelbaum1, O. Dar-Issa2, N. Iraki2 and H. Czosnek1; 1The Otto Warburg Minerva Center for Agricultural Biotechnology & The Robert H. Smith Institute for Plant Science and Genetics in Agriculture, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Rehovot, Israel; 2UNESCO Biotechnology Center, Bethlehem University, Bethlehem, West Bank, Palestinian Authority

5:10pm–5:30pm

Session Recap and GROUP DISCUSSION

5:30pm–8:00pm

Poster Session & Networking Reception

 

Wednesday, December 6, 2006 (Day III)

7:30am–5:30pm

Registration Office Open

7:30am–8:30am

Early Morning Refreshments

8:30am–10:10am

SESSION IV - Chemical Control & Resistance Management

MODERATOR: Rami Horowitz, Director, Research Scientist, ARO, The Volcani Center, Israel

8:30am–8:40am

Opening Remarks and Session Overview by Moderator

8:40am–9:10am

Insecticide Resistance in Bemisia tabaci: A Global Perspective — Ian Denholm, Kevin Gorman, and Martin Williamson; Rothamsted Research, Harpenden, Hertfordshire, England

9:10am–9:30am

Management of Bemisia, TYLCV, and Insecticide Resistance in Florida Vegetables David J. Schuster1, Philip A. Stansly2, Phyllis R. Gilreath3, and Jane E. Polston4; 1Univeristy of Florida/IFAS, Gulf Coast Research & Education Center, Wimauma, FL, USA; 2University of Florida/IFAS, Southwest Florida Research & Education Center, Immokalee, FL, USA; 3University of Florida/IFAS, Department of Agricultural and Biological Engineering, Gainesville, FL, USA; 4University of Florida/IFAS, Department of Plant Pathology, Gainesville, FL, USA

9:30am–9:50am

Imidacloprid Resistance of Bemisia tabaci in Crete, Greece — Emmanouil Roditakis1, Nikos E. Roditakis1, Maria Grispou1, John Vontas2 and Anastasia Tsagkarakou1; 1Laboratory of Entomology and Agricultural Zoology, Plant Protection Institute of Heraklion, National Agricultural Research Foundation, Heraklion, Crete, Greece; 2Laboratory of Pesticide Science, Agricultural University of Athens, Athens, Greece

9:50am–10:10am

Management of Bemisia Resistance: Cotton in the SW USA – Timothy J. Dennehy; Dept. Entomology, UA, Tucson, AZ, USA

10:10am–10:30am

Refreshment Break & Networking

10:30am–12:10pm

SESSION IV continued – Chemical Control & Resistance Management

MODERATOR: Timothy J. Dennehy, Distinguished Outreach Professor, University of Arizona, Tucson, USA

10:30am–10:50am

The Biotypes B and Q of Bemisia tabaci in Israel – Distribution, Resistance to Insecticides and Implications for Pest Management – A. Rami Horowitz1, Svetlana Kontsedalov2, V. Khasdan1 H. Breslauer1 and I. Ishaaya2; 1 Dept. of Entomology, ARO, Gilat Research Center, Israel; 2Dept. of Entomology, ARO, The Volcani Center, Bet Dagan, Israel

10:50am–11:10am

Reversal of Resistance to Pyriproxyfen in the Q Biotype of Bemisia tabaci (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) — Shai Morin1, Margaret Wilson1, Pnina Moshitzky1, Einat Laor1, and A. Rami Horowitz2; 1Department of Entomology, the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Faculty of Agricultural, Food and Environmental Quality Sciences, Rehovot, Israel

11:10am–11:30am

Building Capacity & Integration in Whitefly Management: Cross-Commodity Cooperation and Areawide BenefitsPeter C. Ellsworth, John C. Palumbo and Al Fournier, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, USA

11:30am–11:50am

Relationship of Bemisia tabaci Adult Mortalities and Population Control to Imidacloprid Concentrations in Cantaloupes — S. J. Castle1 and J. C. Palumbo2; 1USDA, ARS Arid-Land Agricultural Research Center, Maricopa, AZ, USA; 2Department of Entomology, University of Arizona, Yuma Agricultural Center, Yuma, AZ, USA

11:50am–12:10pm

Session Recap and GROUP DISCUSSION

12:10pm–1:30pm

Group Lunch

1:30pm–3:10pm

SESSION V – IPM & Biological Control

MODERATOR: Dan Gerling, Professor, Department of Zoology, Tel Aviv University, Ramat Aviv, Israel

1:30pm–1:40pm

Opening Remarks and Session Overview by Moderator

1:40pm–2:00pm

Implementation of Chemical and Biological Protection Compounds of Different Chemical and/or Biological Groups against Whiteflies in IPM Systems Guido Sterk1, M. Van de Veire2 and K. Put1; 1Biobest N.V. Belgium; 2Ghent University, Faculty Agricultural & Applied Biological Sciences Belgium

2:00pm–2:20pm

Controlling the Tobacco Whitefly Bemisia Tabaci (Genn.) (Hom.: Aleyrodidae) in Horticultural Crops with the Predatory Mite Amblyseius swirskii (Athias-Henriot) — Javier Calvo1, Karel Bolckmans2, José E. Belda1; 1Departamento I+D, Koppert Biological Systems, Águilas (Murcia), Spain; 2Koppert Biological Systems, AD Berkel en Rodenrijs, The Netherlands

2:20pm–2:40pm

Biological Control of Whitefly in Poinsettia in Ontario, Canada — Graeme D. Murphy1, M. Short2, A-M Cooper3, M. Fast4, D. Neal5, and S. Jandricic2 1Ontario Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs, Vineland, Ontario, Canada; 2Eco Habitat Agri Services, Puslinch, Ontario, Canada. 3Plant Products Co. Ltd. Brampton, Ontario, Canada; 4Global Horticultural Inc. Beamsville, Ontario, Canada; 5Koppert Canada Limited, Scarborough, Ontario, Canada

2:40pm–3:00pm

Bemisia tabaci Biotype Q and its Natural Enemies in Vegetable and Ornamental Crops — Judit Arnó, J. Roig and R. Gabarra, Departament de Protecció Vegetal. IRTA-Cabrils, (Barcelona), Spain

3:00pm–3:20pm

Refreshment Break & Networking (Poster Displays to be Removed)

3:20pm–5:30pm

SESSION V continued - IPM & Biological Control

MODERATOR: Jesusa Crisostomo Legaspi, USDA, ARS, CMAVEFAMU-CBC, Tallahassee, FL, USA

3:20pm–3:40pm

Conservation of Natural Enemies Through use of Selective Insecticides:  Recent Developments — Steven E. Naranjo1 and Peter C. Ellsworth2, 1 USDA-ARS, Arid-Land Agricultural Research Center, Maricopa, AZ, USA; 2 Department of Entomology, University of Arizona, Maricopa Agricultural Center, Maricopa, AZ, USA

3:40pm–4:00pm

Status of Eretmocerus (Hymenoptera: Aphelinidae) Systematics — Gregory Zolnerowich, Department of Entomology, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS, USA

4:00pm–4:20pm

Detection of Bemisia tabaci (Homoptera: Aleyrodidae) Remains in Predator Guts using a Sequence-Characterized Amplified Region Marker — Gui-Fen Zhang1, 2, Zhi-Chuang Lü1, Fang-Hao Wan1, 2 1 State Key Laboratory for Biology of Plant Diseases and Insect Pests, Institute of Plant Protection, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Beijing, China; 2 Center for Management of Invasive Alien Species, Ministry of Agriculture, Beijing, China

4:20pm–4:40pm

Novel Candidates for the Development of Biopesticides to Control Whitefly Pests — Dale B. Gelman1, Jing S. Hu1, Phyllis A. W. Martin1, Michael B. Blackburn1 and Michael E. Salvucci2. 1Insect Biocontrol Laboratory, USDA, ARS. Beltsville, MD, USA .  2Western; Cotton Research Laboratory, USDA, ARS, Phoenix, AZ, USA

4:40pm–5:00pm

Intraguild Interactions between Bemisia tabaci Predator, Delphastus catalinae, and Parasitoid, Encarsia sophia, and their Impacts on Whitefly Suppression — Lian-Sheng Zang and Tong-Xian Liu; Vegetable IPM Laboratory, Texas A&M Agricultural Experiment Station, Weslaco, TX USA

5:00pm–5:20pm

Life History of Delphastus catalinae: A Predator of Bemisia tabaci — Jesusa Crisostomo Legaspi1, Alvin M. Simmons2, and Benjamin C. Legaspi, Jr.3   1USDA, ARS, CMAVE-FAMU-CBC, Tallahassee, FL, USA;  2U.S. Vegetable Laboratory, USDA-ARS, Charleston, SC, USA  3FL PSC, FL, USA

5:20pm–5:40pm

Session Recap and GROUP DISCUSSION

7:00pm–10:00pm

Gala Dinner Event

 

Thursday, December 7, 2006 (Day IV)

   - Bemisia Field Trip OR Join the Whitefly Genomics Workshop* (December 7 & 8, 2006)

7:30am–8:00am

Early Morning Refreshments for Field Trip Participants

8:00am–3:30pm

Field Trip for Bemisia Workshop Attendees

8:00am

Bus Departs Hawk’s Cay Resort

9:30am–10:15am

Tour of a tomato farm with whitefly problems

10:30am–11:15am

Tour of an ornamental operation with whitefly concerns.

11:45am–12:30pm

Tour of the UF/IFAS Tropical Research and Education Center (TREC)

12:30pm–1:15pm

Lunch at the TREC

3:30pm

Return to Hawk’s Cay Resort

A representative at each stop will be available to describe their problems with whiteflies, their actions to deal with these problems, and to share what they would like to see in the way of advances in management technology

*Bemisia Workshop attendees not participating in the Bemisia Field Trip are
encouraged to register and attend the Whitefly Genomics Workshop on Thursday and Friday.

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Bemisia Workshop Speaker Instructions

  • Please complete the SPEAKER CONFIRMATION FORM and FAX it to 1-352-392-9734 no later than Friday, October 13.

  • Please review Speaker Instructions which provides detailed information about submitting your presentation media to conference staff.

  • NOTE: If you will also be presenting a poster, see Poster Presenter Instructions.

  • Click here to view a PDF of the Program Agenda. To determine when you are scheduled to speak, click on the EDIT command in the tool bar of your Internet browser, select FIND, type in your last name and click on FIND NEXT. The cursor will automatically go to where your name is listed in the program. If you submitted multiple abstracts, be sure to click FIND NEXT to determine everywhere your name appears in the agenda and/or poster directory. Please make a note of each time you are scheduled to speak.

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Bemisia Workshop Poster Directory

(Abstract titles are listed in alphabetical order by the presenting author’s last name. Presenting author names are indicated in bold.) [Printable Poster Directory (PDF format)]

Impact of Temperatures and Plant Species on the Biological Features of the Castor Bean Whitefly, Trialeurodes Ricini Misra (Himeptera: Alyrodidae) — Nagdy F. Abdel-Baky, Economic Entomology Department, Faculty of Agriculture, Mansoura University, Mansoura

Host Plants, Geographical Distribution and Natural Enemies of Sycamore Whitefly, Bemisia afer (Priesner & Hosny) (Homoptera: Aleyrodidae) as a New Economic Pest in Egypt  — Shaaban Abd-Rabou, Plant Protection Research Institute, Agricultural Research Center, Dokki, Giza, Egypt

Isolation of Bacillus thuringiensis Strain from Kuwait’s Soil Effective against Whitefly Larvae
Yousif Al-Shayji and N. Shaheen, Biotechnology Department, Kuwait Institute for Scientific Research, Shuwaikh, Kuwait

Genetic Distance Analysis Among a Large Set of B. tabaci Samples — Petra Bleeker1,2, Suzan Gabriëls1, Kai Ament2, Paul Diergaarde1,2, Isa Lesna2, Michel Haring2, Michiel de Both1, Robert Schuurink2; 1Keygene NV, Wageningen, The Netherlands, 2University of Amsterdam, Swammerdam Institute of Life Sciences, Dept. Plant Physiology, Amsterdam, The Netherlands

Monitoring Bemisia Resistance to Neonicotinoid Insecticides in Floriculture Crops — Terry Junek, Carlos E. Bográn, and Patricia Pietrantonio, Department of Entomology, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX, USA

Control Strategies for Bemisia tabaci (Genn.) Biotype B and Other Insect Vectors in Tomato Lycopersicum esculentum (Mill.) Arlindo L. Boiça, Júnior1, M.A.A. Macedo2, N.R. Chagas Filho1, M.R. Angelini1, and A.L. Boiça Neto3; 1- Departamento de Fitossanidade – Faculdade de Ciências Agrárias e Veterinárias – Campus de Jaboticabal/SP, Brasil; 2- Departamento de Proteção de Plantas – Faculdade de Ciências Agrárias da Unesp – Campus de Botucatu/SP, Brasil; 3- Pontifícia Universidade Católica – PUC, Campinas/SP, Brasil

Resistance of Common Bean Genotypes to Bemisia tabaci (Genn. 1889) Biotype B (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) in Two Growing Seasons — Arlindo L. Boiça Júnior1, F. Gonçalves de Jesus1, R. M. Pitta1, M. C. Salvador 1, and C. P. Stein2; 1- Departamento de Fitossanidade – Faculdade de Ciências Agrárias e Veterinárias – Campus de Jaboticabal/SP, Brasil; 2- Setor de Entomologia, Instituto Agronômico-IAC, Campinas, SP. BR

Bayesian Phylogenetic Analysis of Mtochondrial COI DNA Sequence from Global Samples of Bemisia tabaci (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) L.M. Boykin1, R.G. Shatters Jr.1, R.C. Rosell2, C.L. McKenzie1 R.A. Bagnall2, Paul De Barro3, and D.R. Frohlich21USDA US Horticultural Research Laboratory, Ft. Pierce, FL, USA, 2Biology Department, University of St. Thomas, Houston, TX, USA, 3 CSIRO Entomology, Indooroopilly, Australia

Out of Africa: Diversity and Host Plant Utilization in Sub-Saharan Bemisia tabaci — L.M. Boykin1,
C.L. McKenzie1, R.C. Rosell2, R.A. Bagnall2, R.G. Shatters Jr.1, and D.R. Frohlich2 1USDA US Horticultural Research Laboratory, Ft. Pierce, FL, USA, 2Biology Department, University of St. Thomas, Houston, Tx, USA

Positive Evidence for Interbreeding and Differential Gene Flow between Three Well Characterized Biotypes of the Bemisia Tabaci Complex (Gennadius) (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) Excludes Geographic and Host Barriers as Isolating Factors — Rafael De J. Caballero and J.K. Brown, 1Department of Entomology, and 2Department of Plant Sciences, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, USA

Fertility of Bemisia tabaci and Sex Ratio Determination According to Male AvailabilityS. J. Castle, USDA, ARS Arid-Land Agricultural Research Center, Maricopa, AZ, USA

Bemisia tabaci Nymphal Feeding Pathway in Cotton — C. C. Chu1 T. P. Freeman2 J. S. Buckner3and T. J. Henneberry1; 1USDA, ARS, Arid-Land Agricultural Research Center, Marcopa, AZ, USA;2Electron Microscopy Center, North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND, USA; 3USDA, ARS, Biosciences Research Laboratory, Fargo, ND, USA

Effects of Heat Shock on Survival and Fecundity of Two Whitefly Species, Trialeurodes vaporariorum (Westwood) and Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) B-biotype (Homoptera: Aleyrodidae) — Fang-Hao Wan1, 2*, Ming Xie1, 2, and Xu-Hong Cui1; 1 State Key Laboratory for Biology of Plant Diseases and Insect Pests, Institute of Plant Protection, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Beijing, China; 2 Center for Management of Invasive Alien Species, Ministry of Agriculture, Beijing, China

Cross-commodity Guidelines for Neonicotinoid Insecticides in Arizona — J. C. Palumbo1, Ellsworth, P. C.1,
A. Fournier2, T.J. Dennehy1, R. L. Nichols3; 1Department of Entomology, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ; 2Maricopa Agricultural Center, University of Arizona, Maricopa, AZ; 3Cotton Incorporated, Cary, NC

Novel Measurement of Group Adoption of IPM in Diverse Cropping Communities — Ellsworth, P. C.1,
J. C. Palumbo1, A. Fournier2, Y. Carriere1, C. Ellers-Kirk1; 1Department of Entomology, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ; 2Maricopa Agricultural Center, University of Arizona, Maricopa, AZ

A Molecular Phylogeny of Indo-Australian Aleyrodidae — P. DeBarro1, M. Coombs1, R. Rosell2, H. Costa3, and D.R. Frohlich2; 1CSIRO, Brisbane, QLD, Australia, 2Biology Department, University of St. Thomas, Houston, TX, USA, 3Entomology Department, University of California, Riverside, CA, USA

Activity of some Biorational and Conventional Insecticides against Bemisia tabaci and their Compatibility with Whitefly Parasitoids — Judit Arnó, J. Roig and R. Gabarra, Departament de Protecció Vegetal. IRTA, Cabrils (Barcelona), Spain

Microsatellite Markers in the Entomopathogenic Fungus Paecilomyces Fumosoroseus for Monitoring of Isolates Introduced against Bemisia Tabaci, Epidemiological and Population Genetics Studies — Nathalie Gauthier 1a, Marie-Claude Bon 2, Cécile Dalleau-Clouet 1B, Jacques Fargues 1B; 1 Campus International de Baillarguet, Centre de Biologie et de Gestion des Populations, A Institut de Recherche pour le Développement (IRD) and B Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique (INRA), Montferrier sur Lez, France; 2 European Biological Control Laboratory, USDA-ARS, Montferrier sur Lez, France

Distribution of Secondary Symbionts in Israeli Populations of Bemisia tabaci — Murad Ghanim1, Yuval Gottlieb1, Elad Chiel2, Einat Zchori-Fein3; 1 Institute of Plant protection, Department of Entomology, the Volcani Center, Bet Dagan, Israel; 2Department of Evolutionary and Environmental Biology, University of Haifa, Haifa; 3Laboratory of Genetics, Newe-Ya'ar research center, ARO, Ramat-Yishai

Biotype Monitoring and Genetic Relationships of Bemisia tabaci in Greece: Mitochondrial DNA and Microsatellite Polymoprhism — A. Tsagkarakou1, C. S. Tsigenopoulos2, K. Gorman3, J. B.Kristoffersen1 J. Lagnel2, and I. D. Bedford4. ; 1National Agricultural Research Foundation, Plant Protection Institute, Heraklion, Greece; 2Institute of Marine Biology and Genetics, Hellenic Centre for Marine Research, Heraklion, Greece; 3Rothamsted Research, Harpenden, Hertfordshire, United Kingdom; 4John Innes Centre, Colney Lane, Norwich, Norfolk, United Kingdom

Bemisia tabaci (Homoptera: Aleyrodidae) Instar Preference by the Parasitoids Eretmocerus mundus and Encarsia pergandiella (Hymenoptera: Aphelinidae) — S. M. Greenberg1, W. A. Jones2, and T.-X. Liu3; 1Beneficial Insect Research Unit, Kika de la Garsa Subtropical Agricultural Research Center ARS-USDA, Weslaco, TX, USA; 2Current address: European Biological Control Laboratory ARS-USDA, France; 3Texas Agricultural Experiment Station, Texas A&M University, Weslaco, TX, USA

Performances of Three Types of Insect Screens as a Physical Barrier Against Bemisia Tabaci and their Impact on Tylcv Incidence in Greenhouse Tomato in the Souss Valley of Morocco — Hanafi A., IAV HASSAN II, Complexe Horticole d’Agadir, Department of Plant Protection, IPP Unit; Agadir Morocco

Pest Situation and Biological Control of Bemisia tabaci in Canary Islands — A. González1 A., R. Martin1,  M.A. Reyes1, I. Jiménez1, V. Suárez1, I. De Paz1, I. Echevarría1, A. Carnero2, J.M. Rodríguez3,  E. Hernández – Suárez2; 1Plant Plant Protection Service, Gov.of Canary Islands, Spain; 2Plant Protection Dpto. ICIA. Canary Islands, Spain; 3Agriculture Service of  Cabildo. Gran Canaria, Spain

Looking for Bemisia tabaci Biotype Q in Florida: Results of Biotype Sampling from 2005-2006 —
Greg S. Hodges
1 and Cindy L. McKenzie2; 1Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, Division of Plant Industry, Gainesville, FL, USA; 2USDA, U.S. Horticultural Research Lab, Fort Pierce, FL, USA

Within Plant Distribution of Bemisia tabaci and its Principal Parasitoids on Cassava Mosaic Disease (CMD) Resistant and Susceptible Varieties — S. Kyamanywa1, P. Asiimwe1, 2, M. Otim1, D. Gerling3 and J. Legg4, 5; 1Department of Crop Science, Makerere University, Kampala, Uganda; 2International Institute of Tropical Agriculture - Uganda, Kampala, Uganda; 3 Zoology Department, Tel Aviv University, Israel; 4International Institute of Tropical Agriculture - Tanzania, Dar es salaam, Tanzania; 5Natural Resources Institute, University of Greenwich, Chatham Maritime

Symptoms and Complete Nucleotide Sequence Analysis of Sweet Potato Leaf Curl Virus Transmitted by Bemisia tabaci Hae-Ryun Kwak1, Mi-Nam Jung2, Mi-Kyeong Kim1, Minho Lee1, Jin-Woo Park1, Su-Heon Lee1, and Hong-Soo Choi1; 1Department of Agricultural Biology, NIAST, RDA, Suwon, Republic of Korea; 2Mokpo Experiment Station, NICS, RDA, Mokpo, Republic of Korea

Comparison of Performance on Different Host Plants between the B biotype and a non-B Biotype of Bemisia tabaci from Zhejiang, China — Lian-Sheng Zang1,2 and Shu-Sheng Liu1, 1Institute of Insect Science, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, China, 2College of Agriculture, Jilin Agricultural University, Jilin, China

Oviposition, Development, and Survivorship of Eretmocerus melanoscutus (Hymenoptera: Aphelinidae) Parasitizing Nymphs of Bemisia tabaci (Homoptera: Aleyrodidae) — Tong-Xian Liu, Vegetable IPM Laboratory, Texas Agricultural Experiment Station, Texas A&M University System, Weslaco, TX, USA

Fitness of Encarsia sophia (Hymenoptera: Aphelinidae) Parasitizing Trialeurodes vaporariorum and Bemisia tabaci (Homoptera: Aleyrodidae) — Chen Luo12 and Tong-Xian Liu1. Vegetable IPM Laboratory, Texas A&M Agricultural Experiment Station, Weslaco, TX, USA; 2Institute of Plant and Environment Protection, Beijing Academy of Agriculture and Forestry Sciences, Beijing USA

Impact of Insecticide Residue on Bemisia tabaci (B-Biotype) — Scott W. Ludwig1 and Cindy McKenzie 2; 1Texas Cooperative Extension, Overton, TX, USA; 2 U. S. Horticultural Research Laboratory, Fort Pierce, FL, USA

Development, Longevity, Fecundity, and Survivorship of Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) Biotype ‘B’ on Six Cotton Cultivars — Chen Luo1*, Qing-Gang Gao1,2, Tie-Lu Mo2, Fan Zhang1, and Zhi-Li Zhang1; 1Institute of Plant and Environment Protection, Beijing Academy of Agriculture and Forestry Sciences, Beijing, China; 2Department of Entomology, College of Plant Protection, Shandong Agricultural University, Taia, China

Influences of Bt Cotton on Population Dynamics of Bemisia tabaci —R.S. Mann1, University of Florida/IFAS, Gulf Coast Research and Education Center (GCREC), Wimauma, FL, USA

Monitoring of Imidacloprid Resistance in Biotype B of Bemisia tabaci in Florida D. J. Schuster1,
R. S. Mann1, Marco Toapanta1 R.
Cordero,2 S. Thompson1, and R. F. Morris3; 1 University of Florida, IFAS, Gulf Coast Research and Education Center, Wimauma, FL, USA; B & W Quality Growers, Inc., Fellsmere, FL, USA; 3 Bayer CropScience, Lakeland, FL, USA

Current Situation of Bemisia tabaci in Vegetable Crops in Portugal — Mateus, C., Amaro, F., Louro, D.and Mexia, A.; Plant Protection Department. Estação Agronómica Nacional, Oeiras, Portugal

Monitoring the U. S Ornamental Industries B’s and Q’s — C. L. McKenzie1, Jim Bethke2, Laura Boykin1, Frank Byrne2, Joe Chamberlin3, Dan Gilrein4, Paula Hall1, Scott Ludwig5, Ron Oetting6, Lance Osborne7, Lin Schmale8, Robert G. Shatters, Jr.1; 1Subtropical Insect Research Unit, U. S. Horticultural Research Laboratory, USDA-ARS, Fort Pierce, FL, USA; 2Department of Entomology, University of California, Riverside, CA, USA; 3Valent USA Corporation, Snellville, GA, USA; 4Cornell University Cooperative Extension of Suffolk County, Long Island Horticultural Research and Extension Center, Riverhead, New York, USA; 5Texas Cooperative Extension, Texas A&M University, Overton, TX, USA; 6College of Agriculture and Environmental Sciences, University of Georgia, Griffin, GA, USA; 7Mid-Florida Research and Extension Center, IFAS, University of Florida, Apopka, FL, USA; 8Society of American Florists, Alexandria, VA, USA

Progress in Positional Cloning of CMD2 the Gene that Confers High level of Resistance to the Cassava Mosaic Disease (CMD) Isabel Moreno1; Jeffrey Tomkins2; Emmanuel Okogbenin3 and Martin Fregene1; 1Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical (CIAT), Cali, Colombia. 2Clemson University Genomics Institute (CUGI), Clemson, South Carolina, USA.3International Institute for Tropical Agriculture (IITA), Ibadan, Nigeria, Africa

Mating Behavior and its Effect on Reproductive Potential of the B and Q Biotypes of Bemisia tabaci —
S. Morin
1 and Moshe Elbaz1 1Department of Entomology, the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Faculty of Agricultural, Food and Environmental Quality Sciences, Rehovot, Israel

Effects of SB Plant InvigoratorÒ on Bemisia tabaci Development in Tomato Plants — Mariano Muñiz,
G. Nombela, A. Gómez, and D. Alonso
Plant Protection Department, Instituto de Ciencias Agrarias Centro de Ciencias Medioambientales (CSIC), Madrid, Spain

Establishment and Impact of Exotic Aphelinid Parasitoids in Arizona:  A Life Table Approach —
Steven E. Naranjo,
USDA-ARS, Arid-Land Agricultural Research Center, Maricopa, AZ, USA

Resistance to Silverleaf Whitefly, Bemisia argentifolii (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) in Gossypium thurberi, a Wild Cotton Species — Greg P. Walker1 and Eric T. Natwick2; 1Department of Entomology University of California, Riverside; Riverside, CA, USA 2Division of Agriculture and Natural Resources University of California Cooperative Extension Holtville, CA, USA

Induced Plant Responses in the Bemisia tabaci-Tomato SystemMariano Muñiz, G. Nombela, D. Alonso and A. Gómez, Plant Protection Department, Instituto de Ciencias Agrarias - Centro de Ciencias Medioambientales (CSIC), Madrid, Spain

Greenhouse Whitefly Eggs and Nymphs Density on Gerbera jamesonii Under Different Nitrogenous Fertilizer Regimes — Laura D. Ortega-Arenas1, D. A. Miranda A.1, and M. Sandoval-Villa2; 1Programa en Entomología, and 2Programa en Edafología, Campus Montecillo, Colegio de Postgraduados, Montecillo, Estado de México. México

Influence of Weeds on the Whitefly-Virus-Parasitoid Complex in Veracruz, Mexico — Salomón Medina1,
L. D. Ortega-Arenas1, H. González-Hernández1, and J. A. Villanueva2
1Programa en Entomología, Campus Montecillo, Colegio de Postgraduados, Montecillo Estado de México; 2Programa en Agroecosistemas Tropicales, Campus Veracruz, Colegio de Postgraduados, Veracruz, México

Interaction Between Two Entomopathogenic Fungi with the Parasitoid Encarsia formosa Gahan in the Greenhouse Whitefly Control — Félix García-Valente1, L. D. Ortega-Arenas1, H. González-Hernández1,
F. Tamayo-Mejía2, and A. Guzmán-Franco1;1 Programa en Entomología, Campus Montecillo, Colegio de Postgraduados, Montecillo Estado de México, México.2Sanidad Vegetal, SAGARPA, Celaya, Guanajuato, México

Managing Bemisia on Organically Grown Herbs — L.S. Osborne1; G.J. Hochmuth II2; R.C. Hochmuth3; and D. Sprenkel4; 1Mid-Florida Research and Education Center, IFAS, University of Florida, Apopka, FL, USA 2Office of the Dean for Research, IFAS, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA 3North Florida Research and Education Center, IFAS, University of Florida, Live Oak, FL, USA 4North Florida Research and Education Center, IFAS, University of Florida, Quincy, FL, USA

Spiromesifen: A New Pest Management Tool for Whitefly Management — Nilima Prabhaker and Nick C. Toscano Department of Entomology, University of California, Riverside, CA,USA

CORAGENTM SC (DPX-E2Y45): A Novel Anthranilamide Insecticide: Pest Spectrum with Emphasis on Whitefly Control in Vegetables — 1Hector Portillo; 1Paula G. Marçon, 2Robert W. Williams, 3Danny Tamayo, 4Daniel W. Sherrod 1Fred W. Marmor 1DuPont Crop Protection, Stine Haskell Research Center, Newark, DE, USA 2DuPont Crop Protection, Bradenton, FL 3DuPont Crop Protection, Yuma, Arizona, USA 4DuPont Crop Protection, Memphis - TN, USA

Arthropod Predation on Bemisia tabaci on Cassava in Uganda: Preliminary Results from Molecular Gut Analysis — Daniel P. Rowley1, Peter Asiimwe2, James P. Legg3,4, and Matthew H. Greenstone1 1Insect Biocontrol Laboratory, USDA-Agricultural Research Service, Beltsville, MD, USA 2International Institute of Tropical Agriculture-Uganda, Kampala, Uganda 3International Institute of Tropical Agriculture-Tanzania, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania 4Natural Resources Institute, Chatham Maritime, Kent, UK

DuPont RynaxypyrÔ (DPX-E2Y45): A Novel Anthranilamide Insecticide for Managing Bemisia tabaci and Interfering with Transmission of Tomato Yellow Leaf Curl Virus on Tomato Transplants —
David J. Schuster1
, Natália A. Peres1, Robert W. Williams2, Paula C. Marçon3, and Hector E. Portillo3 1University of Florida/IFAS, Gulf Coast Research & Education Center, Wimauma, FL, USA 2Dupont Crop Protection, Raleigh, NC, USA 3Dupont Crop Protection, Stine-Haskell Research Center, Newark, DE, USA

Development of a Management Program against Silverleaf Whitefly (SLW), Bemisia argentifolii Bellows & Perring (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae), using Chemical Insecticides — D. R. Seal (dak) University of Florida-IFAS, Tropical Research and Education Center, Homestead, FL, USA

A Knottin-Like Putative Antimicrobial Gene Family in the Whitefly Bemisia tabaci ‘B: Cloning and Transcript Regulation — Robert G. Shatters, Jr.1, C. L. McKenzie1, Laura M. Boykin1, Shirley Gazit2, Xiomara Sinisterra3, A. A. Weathersbee III1, J. K. Brown4 and Henryk Czosnek2; 1 Subtropical Insects Research Unit, U. S. Horticultural Research Laboratory, ARS, USDA, Fort Pierce, FL, USA 2The Robert H. Smith Institute for Plant Science and Genetics in Agriculture, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Rehovot, Israel 3 IRREC, IFAS, University of Florida, Fort Pierce, FL USA 4Department of Plant Sciences, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, USA

Wild Germplasm: Plant Resistance for Watermelon — Alvin Simmons1, Amnon Levi1, Angela Davis2, Kai-shu Ling1, Rolando Lopez3, D. Michael Jackson1, Chandrasekar Kousik1, B. Merle Shepard3, and Judy Thies1; 1USDA, ARS, U.S. Vegetable Laboratory, Charleston, SC, USA; 2USDA, ARS, Lane Research Center, Lane, Oklahoma, USA; 3Coastal Research and Education Center, Clemson, University, Charleston, SC, USA

Biologically Based Management of Whiteflies in Greenhouse Vegetable Production — P. A. Stansly, University of Florida/IFAS, Southwest Florida Research and Education Center (SWFREC), Immokalee, FL, USA

Cotton Whitefly, Bemisia tabaci (Genn.) (Hom., Aleyrodidae) Degree-Hour Model for Predicting Phenological Development — B. Tafaghodinia1, and S. Iranmanesh2 1Entolomology department, Agricultural Research Center, Iranian Research Organization for Science and Technology, Tehran, Iran 2 Entomology Department, Faculty of Agriculture, Tehran University, Karaj, Iran

Oberon® 2SC: A New Resistant Management Tool for Whitefly Control in Vegetables — Marco Toapanta1, David Schuster2, Rajinder Mann2, Roberto Cordero2, Lamar Buckelew3, Robert Steffens3, Shane Hand3, Richard Rudolph3, and Ralf Nauen4; 1Bayer CropScience, Brandon, FL., USA 2Gulf Coast Research and Education Center, University of Florida, Wimauma, FL., USA 3Bayer CropScience, Research Triangle Park, NC., USA. 4Bayer CropScience, Monheim, Germany

Occurrence of Bemisia tabaci B- and Q-biotypes in Korea — Minho Lee, Ki-Baik Uhm, Sunyoung Lee, Heeyong Park, Hong-Soo Choi, and Jin-Woo Park, Department of Agricultural Biology, NIAST, RDA, Suwon, Republic of Korea

Host Plant Infection by a Plant Pathogen Changes Parasitoid Host-Searching Behavior: A Case Study Using Whiteflies and Encarsia Formosa — Liande Wang1,2, Stefan Vidal2; 1 Key Laboratory of Biopesticide and Chemical Biology, MOE. Fujian Agriculture & Forestry University, Fuzhou, P.R. China 2Department of Crop Science, Entomological Section, Georg-August-University, Goettingen, Germany

Response by a Whitefly Predator, Delphastus catalinae to Toxins from Verticillium lecanii and Mass Rearing Techniques for the Ladybeetle — Liande Wang1,2, Jian Huang1, Hongwei Luo1; 1 Key Laboratory of Biopesticide and Chemical Biology, MOE. Fujian Agriculture & Forestry University, Fuzhou, P.R. China 2 Department of Crop Science, Entomological Section, Georg-August-University, Goettingen, Germany

Responses of Two Whitefly Species, Trialeurodes vaporariorum (Westwood) and Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) B-biotype (Homoptera: Aleyrodidae), to Lower Temperature — Ming Xie1, 2, Yan-Hua Chen1, Fang-Hao Wan1, 2 ; 1 State Key Laboratory for Biology of Plant Diseases and Insect Pests, Institute of Plant Protection, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Beijing, China 2 Center for Management of Invasive Alien Species, Ministry of Agriculture, Beijing, China

Situations and Researches of Bemisia and Other Whiteflies in China — Fengming Yan, College of Life Sciences, Peking University, Beijing, China

 

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Bemisia Workshop Poster Presenter Instructions

  • Please complete the POSTER CONFIRMATION FORM and FAX it to 1-352-392-9734 no later than Friday, October 13.

  • Please make plans to arrive in Duck Key on Sunday, December 3 in time to set-up your poster between 5pm – 8pm. All posters will be on display throughout the duration of the workshop.

  • NOTE: If you were also selected to make an oral presentation, see Speaker Instructions.

  • Click here to view a PDF of the POSTER DIRECTORY. To find where your abstract is listed, simply click on the EDIT command of the tool bar in your Internet browser, select FIND and type in your last name. Hit ENTER until you locate where your abstract submission is posted.

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Bemisia Workshop Abstracts to be Published

The Journal of Insect Science (JIS) has offered to publish abstracts submitted to the Bemisia Workshop. This would be in addition to the abstract book being prepared for distribution at the workshop. Inclusion in the JIS publication will be contingent on author’s written consent. This is a great opportunity to disseminate information presented at the workshop.

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Bemisia 2006: THE BOOK

The crowning achievement of the First International Bemisia Workshop in Shoresh Israel was the publication of the book Bemisia: 1995, Taxonomy, biology, Damage, Control, and Management (Dan Gerling and Richard T. Mayer [Eds.] Intercept 1996). Much has happened in the whitefly world since appearance of this definitive work, and it seemed fitting to use the occasion of the 4th Workshop to summarize progress in Bemisia research over the last 10 years. Plans are to divide the book into 5 sections, corresponding to the 5 sessions of the workshop, with session organizers editing their respective sections. Chapters within each section would include, but not necessarily be limited to, session presenters, and would review research within a particular subject area. These chapters will provide yet another opportunity to present information shared at the workshop to the widest possible audience.

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Bemisia Workshop Organizing Committee

Phil Stansly
   
University of Florida, SWFREC, Immokalee, FL USA
 

Cindy McKenzie
   
USHRL, USDA-ARS, Fort Pierce, FL, USA

Judit Arnó i Pujol

   
Departament de Protecció Vegetal, IRTA-Centre de Cabrils, Barcelona, Spain

Dan Gerling

   
Department of Zoology, Tel Aviv University, Israel

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International Whitefly Genomics Workshop
December 7-8, 2006

Whitefly Genomics Workshop Objective & Overview


Tomato Mottle Virus

The overall goal of this workshop is to provide a venue to bring leading whitefly researchers together to develop a concerted effort to advance whitefly genomics research. Specific objectives within this goal are as follows:

  • Officially establish the International Whitefly Genomics Consortium (IWGC) with interested scientists.

  • Develop Steering Committee to aid in coordinating whitefly genomics efforts and Advisory Committee composed of experts to provide guidance on strategies and priorities.

  • Develop consensus on target species and species for which comparative work should be a high priority.

  • Prioritize genomics research objectives with respect to research, industry and grower needs.

  • Outline and prioritize genomics strategies, objectives, goals and data sharing protocols.

  • Develop working groups to focus on specific genomics tasks (i.e. bioinformatics, EST production, microarray production, BAC library construction, mapping, etc).

  • Initiate production of whitefly genomics whitepaper.

  • Stimulate collaborative projects targeting whitefly genomics.

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Whitefly Genomics Workshop Structure


Whitefly Migration

The meeting will be structured to provide speakers representing successful genomics programs to provide insight into “what works and what doesn’t”. Forums will also be presented to allow interaction between industry and researchers that include realistic presentations of how the research will be applied to industry relevant issues, and to allow granting institution representatives to present formulas for successful genomics grants. Then planning sessions will be held to develop research priorities and coordinate efforts at securing whitefly genomics funds. This planning session will be used to outline a whitepaper that will be developed and provided to interested participants as a tool to aid in grant writing and to provide an overall whitefly genomics agenda. Methods of sharing genomics data (sequence data, mapping data, clones, and microarrays) will also be discussed and established. 

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Who Should Attend the Whitefly Genomics Workshop?

Researchers interested in whiteflies, the diseases they vector and their interaction with the plants they feed upon, industry personnel with interest in whitefly control strategies and pesticide resistance issues, and scientists involved in regulatory and monitoring issues related to invasive whitefly biotypes.

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Why You Should Attend the Whitefly Genomics Workshop


Whitefly Mating Dance

Funding for “-omics” research is highly competitive and a major factor in funding support for a genomics program is the impact of the organism on human activity (industry needs), the level of organization and cooperation of researchers worldwide, and the development of researcher infrastructure that will use the vast amount of “-omics” data generated to target well defined problems. Successful genomics programs have addressed these criteria by developing genomics consortiums that meet annually to report progress and coordinate the next steps of the research, and openly share the data generated. We are coordinating an International Whitefly Genomics Workshop to initiate a worldwide coordinated effort in whitefly genomics. 

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Benefits of Attending the Whitefly Genomics Workshop

  • Learn about the most current efforts in whitefly genomics.


    Macrolophus caliginosus
    Credit: Koppert Biological Systems

  • Listen to leaders in the genomics field speak on the power of this technology and how to make it work in your favor.

  • Influence the development of research priorities.

  • Become a part of existing, or develop new, collaborative research efforts in whitefly genomics.

  • As participant in the development of the Whitefly Genomics Whitepaper you can leverage this resource to support grant applications.

  • Gain access to whitefly genomics tools through involvement in the consortium efforts.

  • Develop collaborations for grant writing opportunities.

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Whitefly Genomics Workshop Preliminary Agenda

Thursday, December 7, 2006 (Day IV)

8:00 am Welcome and Introduction - Setting the Stage

Morning of Invited Speakers:

8:30am What can genomics do for you?
9:00am Gene Discovery for Agricultural Biotechnology: Applied Genome Science - A Plant Perspective
9:30am Refreshment Break
10:00am Bioinformatics: Considerations When Starting a Genomics Project
10:30am Tribolium Genomics Project
11:00am Honeybee Genomics Project
11:30am NCBI informatics help
12:00noon Lunch Provided
1:00pm Industry Researcher Forum: Mediated discussion with industry/commodity groups and researchers
2:30pm

Group Meeting: Mediated group discussion with whiteboard to develop consensus on the following topics:    

-  Agreement on consortium principals, whitepaper
   concept and organism of choice?

- Prioritize genomics areas to be targeted

- Develop list of breakout groups & goals to be
   reached by each group

- Develop list of positions to fill (steering committee,
   oversight committee workgroup chairs etc.)

3:30pm Refreshment Break
4:00pm6:00pm Develop Workgroups and Agendas
6:00pm7:00pm Networking Social (dinner on your own)

           

Friday, December 8, 2006 (Day V) – Whitefly Genomics Workshop Continues

Grant Funding Seminars

8:00am

Funding Insect Genomics, A USDA, NRI- Perspective

8:30am

Development of Collaborations: Successful Funding Approaches

9:00am

Prioritizing Genome Sequencing Grant Funding Requests

9:30am Refreshment Break
10:00am Group Meeting: Review and Prioritize Topics for Breakout Groups and Outline of Whitepaper Structure
11:45am Lunch Provided
1:00pm

Breakout WorkGroup Meetings:

- Groups will convene to review topics relative to programmatic subtopics (i.e. bioinformatics, microarrays etc.) These groups will provide an outline for their section of the whitepaper.

2:30pm Refreshment Break
3:00pm

General Session Reconvenes for review of breakout group achievements:

-  Presentation of group action statements and
   priorities

-  Summarization of findings and report on timeline for
   specific deliverables, i.e. Web portal, submission of
   data, development of arrays, work with NCBI for
   presentation of organism specific data etc.

-  Decision on next Genomics Workshop date and
   location

4:00pm

Workshop Review:

-  Identify committee/workgroup members, review
   progress and future plans

6:00pm Whitefly Genomics Workshop Adjourns

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Whitefly Genomics Whitepaper

A major outcome of the Whitefly Genomics Workshop will be the production of the Whitefly Genomics Whitepaper to be published in the Journal of Insect Science, and the journal’s editor has enthusiastically agreed to accept it for review. Whitefly Genomics Workshop participants will have the opportunity to provide input and thus be a co-author on this publication. Genomics Whitepapers provide. . .

  • justification for sequencing organism genomes

  • a layout of the current knowledge of, and gaps within, the organism’s genome information

  • a roadmap that will guide future projects, and

  • a list of deliverables to the scientific community.

The whitepaper also identifies collaborating personnel and presents contacts for those interested in participating in the international effort. Genome whitepapers are a great resource to the scientific community since they function, in part, as a review of the current state of knowledge about an organism and then interface this with a conceptual pathway for future genomic research and how to integrate it into other research disciplines. All individuals who want to be involved in a collaborative international whitefly genomics effort are encouraged to attend this workshop and participate in the development of this white paper.

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Whitefly Genomics Workshop Organizing Committee

 

Judith Brown
    University of Arizona, Plant Science Department, Tucson, AZ, USA

 

Henryk Czosnek
    HUJ, Department of Field Crops and Genetics, Rehovot, Israel

 

Cindy McKenzie
    USHRL, USDA-ARS, Fort Pierce, FL, USA

 

Robert Shatters, Jr.
    USHRL, USDA-ARS, Fort Pierce, FL, USA

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General Information for Both Workshops

Registration Information

The REGISTRATION FEE includes almost ALL meals in conjunction with both workshops.

REGISTRATION FEE SCHEDULE

MEETING ATTENDEE FEE

Bemisia Workshop

Whitefly Genomics

Register for BOTH & SAVE $50

Registration Deadline

Early Bird Discounted Registration

$450

$225

$625

By September 4

Regular Reduced Registration

$550

$275

$775

By October 15

Late Registration

$650

$325

$925

AFTER October 15

STUDENT ATTENDEE FEE

Bemisia Workshop

Whitefly Genomics

Register for BOTH & SAVE $50

Registration Deadline

Early Bird Discounted Registration

$250

$195

$395

By September 4

Regular Reduced Registration

$350

$225

$525

By October 15

Late Registration

$450

$255

$655

AFTER October 15

*Photocopy of valid student ID required. The student fee does not apply to post-docs.
Fee payments must accompany all registrations by the deadline to qualify for the applicable discount.

 

GUEST FEE
(10 years of age and older)

Bemisia Workshop

Whitefly Genomics

PLEASE NOTE:
Guests are not eligible for $50 discount.

Registration Deadline

Early Bird Discounted Registration

$150

$95

By September 4

Regular Reduced Registration

$195

$125

By October 15

Late Registration

$235

$155

AFTER October 15

The Guest Fee is not for use by co-workers.

 

OPTIONAL FIELD TRIP:
Thurs., Dec. 7  (8:30am - 3:00pm)
 Bemisia Attendees Only Please

Bemisia Workshop

Whitefly Genomics

Registration Deadline

Early Bird Discounted Registration

$50

N/A

By September 4

Regular Registration

$75

N/A

By November 1

(The Field Trip Fee includes morning refreshments, lunch and transportation.
Advance registration by November 1 is required.)

 

GALA DINNER (Wednesday, December 6)

Additional dinner tickets may be purchased for non-registered guests of either workshop

$75

 

What Does the Registration Fee Include?

 

Bemisia Workshop Registration 

Meeting & Student Attendee: The Bemisia Workshop Meeting & Student Attendee registration fee, combined with funds contributed by our generous sponsors, provides full participation in the workshop, conference materials, an abstract book, a customized conference portfolio and a canvas tote along with almost all meals throughout the workshop including: Early morning Refreshments, Mid-day and Afternoon Refreshment Breaks, the Sunday Early Bird Social, the Monday Welcome Reception, the Tuesday Networking Reception, the Wednesday Gala Dinner Event and Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday’s lunch.

Guest Fee: The Bemisia Workshop guest fee allows guests 10 years of age and older to attend the Sunday Early Bird Social, the Monday Welcome Reception, the Tuesday Networking Reception and the Wednesday Gala Dinner Event. The Guest Fee is not for use by co-workers.

 

Whitefly Genomics Workshop Registration

Meeting & Student Attendee: The Whitefly Genomics Meeting & Student Attendee registration fee, combined with funds contributed by our generous sponsors, allows full participation in the workshop, including conference materials, early morning refreshments, mid-day and afternoon refreshment breaks, the Wednesday Gala Dinner Event, the Thursday Networking Social and the Thursday and Friday lunch.

Guest Fee: The Whitefly Genomics Workshop guest fee allows guests 10 years of age and older to attend the Wednesday Gala Dinner Event and the Thursday Networking Social. The Guest Fee is not for use by co-workers.

 

Click here for a printable version of the Registration Fee Schedule

 

Before clicking on the Register Now! link below, we recommend that you have payment information on-hand, such as credit card, check number or purchase order number, if we are to invoice your institution.

Advance registration closes at 6am on Monday, November 20. After this date, advance registration closes, and all further registrations will be accepted onsite at the workshop.

 

Refund Policy: All refund requests must be received in writing by November 1st, 2006. A processing fee of $125.00 will be deducted from all meeting participant refunds for either workshop, $25.00 from all guest refunds and $15 from a tour refund.

 

Special Needs: Participants with special needs can be reasonably accommodated by contacting the Office of Conferences & Institutes at least 21 working days prior to the workshop. We can be reached by phone at 1-352-392-5930, by FAX at 1-352-392-9734, or by calling 1-800-955-8771 (TDD). The TDD number can only be accessed from within the State of Florida.

 

Special Events

 

OPTIONAL Field Trip

Thursday, December 7, 2006
8:30am-3:00pm

 

Workshop attendees are invited to participate in a half-day field tour of the Homestead, Florida area, a leader in ornamental, vegetable and horticultural production in the US. This tour will feature a stop at local vegetable and ornamental growers and the the University of Florida/IFAS Tropical Research and Education Center (TREC). The center’s research, teaching, and extension programs focus on tropical and subtropical fruit crops, tropical and temperate vegetable crops, and ornamental crops of southern Florida. The agricultural industry served by the center has an annual farm gate value of $834 million. Multiplier effects make agriculture's impact on the local economy worth over $1 billion annually. Due to the region's humid subtropical climate, TREC is the only state university research center in the continental U.S. focusing on a large number of tropical and subtropical crops. The center's 160 acres consists of offices, laboratories, greenhouses, vegetable fields, and fruit orchards.
 

Participants will have the opportunity to meet with world-renowned scientists conducting research in tropical fruits, row crops and entomology. Also presented will be discussion on the UF Center for Tropical Agriculture (CTA). The program collaborates with several complementary research and training programs/organizations of the University of Florida including the Tropical Conservation and Development Program. (Lunch will be provided on the tour.)

 


 

Wednesday Gala Dinner Event

 

Both workshop schedules include an extravagant Gala Dinner Event on Wednesday evening, December 6. You’ll enjoy a spectacular Gulf setting with island cuisine and refreshing tropical drinks, featuring amusement including fire eaters, contortionists and other exciting entertainment. Whether you are attending the Bemisia or Whitefly Genomics Workshop, make plans to join us for the Wednesday Gala Dinner Event. This is one special evening you won’t want to miss!

 

IMPORTANT NOTE: ADDITIONAL Tickets for the Gala Dinner Event are $75 each. If you are bringing a guest who is not registering for the conference as an accompanying person but wishes to attend the Gala Dinner Event, please order an additional dinner ticket when registering.

 

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Sponsor Recognition & Opportunities

Sponsorship Opportunities: The University of Florida/IFAS and the United States Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service are organizing the 4th International Bemisia Workshop and Whitefly Genomics Workshop as a collaborative effort. If you are interested in becoming one of the diverse institutions worldwide to support this endeavor, click here to print a form containing more information on sponsorship opportunities or contact Phil Stansly or Cindy McKenzie.

A Special Thank You to the following Sponsors:

Return to Index

Hotel Accommodations and Workshop Site



61 Hawk's Cay Boulevard
l Duck Key, Florida 33050
Reservations: 800-432-2242 (U.S. & Canada) or 954-252-5200
Resort Telephone: 305-743-7000
Resort Fax: 305-743-5215
Email: reservations@hawkscay.com
Web Site: http://www.hawkscay.com/

The Keys — a 156-mile long chain of islands — extend like stepping-stones from the tip of Florida’s mainland to Key West, the southernmost city in the United States. Nestled amongst this tropical paradise of rare birds, majestic palms and a magnificent coral reef is Hawk’s Cay Resort - 90 miles south of Miami between Islamorada and Marathon in the heart of the Florida Keys. Situated on 60 acres, Hawk’s Cay is a picture perfect island experience you'll never forget. An elegant hotel with a Caribbean flair, the resort offers a 177-room inn and 295 charming villas reminiscent of days gone by. Featuring a waterfront conference center, a marina, award-winning restaurants and saltwater lagoon, at Hawk's Cay on Duck Key, things just feel good. And so will you.

 

The Hawk’s Cay Resort is offering two types of beautifully appointed guest room accommodations for our group: regular hotel guest rooms and two-bedroom conch villas. Conference participants will primarily be housed in guest room buildings located closest to the main conference center where our meetings and poster sessions will be held.

 

Hotel Information Index

 

HOTEL GUEST ROOMS ($135 single or double)

 

The resort’s regular hotel guestrooms feature 420 sq. ft. of spacious accommodations with separate bath and vanity areas, balcony porches, small refrigerators and coffee makers. These rooms are available at the group rate of $135 a night with one or two people in a room, and $145 a night with three or four people in a room. A $10 charge applies for each additional occupant.

 

TWO BEDROOM CONCH VILLAS ($230 single or double)

 

A very limited number of Conch Villas are available if you are traveling with multiple colleagues from your organization and wish to share accommodations. Individually furnished and decorated, the two bedroom, two bath Conch Villas offer 950 sq. ft. and sleeping space for up to five. Amenities include a full kitchen, washer/dryer, living room, and water view porch with an optional spa upon request. Conch Villas with balcony spas are based on availability and are located farthest from the conference center. Housekeeping service is provided after each 3rd night of stay. ADA compliant villas are available on request. Conch Villas are available at a special group rate of $230 a night with one or two people in a room. A $10 charge applies for each additional occupant with a maximum of five occupants per villa. If you wish to book a Conch Villa, we encourage you to make your hotel reservation as soon as possible.

 

ADDITIONAL GUEST ROOM RATE INFORMATION

 

The Hawk’s Cay nightly resort fee of $10 per guest room or $20 per villa is also incorporated in the guest room rates quoted above. The resort fee includes: parking, unlimited tennis court time (reservations required in advance), daily access to the fitness center, daily access to the boat ramp, coffee daily in all accommodations, complimentary use of all pools, the lagoon and chaise lounge chairs and towels, complimentary local and toll free calls up to 15 minutes and a daily newspaper. NOTE: All room rates are quoted exclusive of applicable state and local taxes, currently 11.5%. (To receive tax exempt status, payment must be made in the form of a government issued check, credit card or purchase order, and, be accompanied by a Florida sales tax exemption certificate presented at check-in. Tax rates are subject to change.)
 

To Make Reservations:

To make a hotel reservation, contact the reservations department at 954-252-5200, or on their toll free reservations line at 800-432-2242 (U.S. & Canada), or call them directly on the Resort Telephone at 305-743-7000. Be sure to specify you are attending the Bemisia Workshop.

 

The group rate will be honored two days prior and two days following the conference, based on availability. The deadline to make your reservation and still receive the discounted group rate is November 1, 2006. After this date, guestrooms and the group rate may no longer be available. As this is a discounted group rate, it is not commissionable to travel agents and Frequent Traveler Points do not apply. 

 

Cancellation Policy for Guest Room Reservations:

Cancellations must be made no later than 8 days prior to arrival or one night's lodging will be charged to your credit card.

 

Share-a-room Information
This service is to assist individuals in locating others interested in sharing accommodations for the symposium. It is the individual's responsibility to make contact with other interested parties. Once a roommate has been located, you may request removal of your email contact.
CLICK HERE to view those wishing to share a hotel room.
Click here to submit your information for posting on the share a hotel room page (Email submissions will be posted within 5 working days).
  • This service will require that your name, gender, email address, affiliation, originating country and smoking preference be posted on a web page accessible to the public.
     
  • After locating a roommate, be sure to reserve your hotel room specifying two double beds as soon as possible. Double rooms tend to fill first and may not be available if you wait.

Click here to have your contact information removed from the list of those wishing to share a hotel room.

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Travel Information

Getting to the Keys

The primary option for getting to Duck Key, FL is by flying into Miami International Airport in Miami, Florida and driving 90 miles south to the Hawk's Cay Resort, or, flying into Key West (usually via Miami) and driving 61 miles north to the resort. The drive to Duck Key is 2.5 hours south from Miami and one hour north from Key West.

After you have arrived at Miami International Airport or Key West International Airport, you have two transportation options: 

1.) Rent a car.

Discounted rates have been negotiated through Avis Rental Car. A seven-day rental is estimated to cost about US$135 for a compact car. A drivers license and major credit card is required to reserve a car. Click here for more information. In order to receive our discounted group rate, specify group code: J907675
 

2.) Take a Shuttle Service from the Airport to the Resort.


Between-the-Seas Shuttle

A new shuttle service is now available in the Keys, and we highly recommend this company. Their staff and drivers are courteous, timely and their bus accommodations are very relaxing and provide a comfortable ride to and from the airport.

Between-the-Seas offers a comfortable ride on a leisure bus (click here to view photos of the bus) and for added enjoyment, they offer complimentary snacks and drinks during the trip. Taxes are included in their price of $75 per person one-way, and $150 round-trip. If a majority of you schedule a ride on this same shuttle, you will have a unique opportunity to visit with each other in a comfortable setting on the ride to and from Duck Key.

To book a seat on the Between-the-Seas shuttle, email your arrival and departure dates and times, the airline carrier and flight numbers, and details and your personal contact information to Mr. Tim Watson, Owner/Operator of Between-the-Seas. He can be reached by email at: tim@betweentheseas.com;
by telephone at: 305-294-7430 or visit their web site at: www.betweentheseas.com/reservations/


The Keys Shuttle

The Keys Shuttle also provides door-to-door service from Ft. Lauderdale and Miami International Airports to Duck Key. Apparently, however, they do not service Key West. The shuttle to the Middle/Upper Keys where Duck Key (Marathon) is located, is estimated to cost US$60 ONE-WAY for a single-person reservation and US$96 ONE-WAY for a two-person reservation. Once you know your flight schedule, call 1-888-765-9997 or 305-289-9997 -OR- Click here to visit their web site.


ADDITIONAL INFORMATION on Shuttle Services:

Between The Seas, Inc.

Heading to Key West? Choose to use the world's first official Mobile Embassy of the Conch Republic! Food & drinks all inclusive! Non-stop between Miami International Airport and Key West. Phone: 231-929-3576

Greyhound Lines

Makes numerous scheduled stops between Miami International Airport
and the Keys, including Key Largo. 1-800-231-2222 or 305-296-9072

By Sea

IF you happen to be visiting family or friends on the west coast before the workshop, you can take the Key West Bight Ferry Terminal Passengers from Ft. Myers Beach and Marco Island on Florida's southwest coast can arrive at this facility in approximately 3.5 hours aboard state-of-the-art ferries operated by the company Key West Express. The 12,500-square-foot terminal is equipped with an information desk, a gift shop specializing in local products and a café offering local fare. Even the walls are decorated with works of local artists. The terminal is the gateway to the island's Historic Seaport District, known locally as The Bight. From here, visitors can stroll along a wooden Harbor Walk lined with charter boats, restaurants and shops and arrive on the fabled Duval Street in about 15 minutes. Numerous local transportation options are also available. Car ferries do not currently serve Key West.

Florida
Keys - By Air

Home
Miami International Airport


Special Workshop Rates
 

 

Share-a-ride to the Workshops

This service is to assist individuals in locating others interested in sharing rides to the workshops. It is the individual's responsibility to make contact with other interested parties. Once a ride has been located, you may request removal of your email contact.

CLICK HERE to view those wishing to share a ride.

Click here to submit your information for posting on the share-a-ride page
     (Email submissions will be posted within 5 working days).

NOTE: This service requires that your name, gender, email address, affiliation and location be posted on a web page accessible to the public.

Click here to have your contact information removed from the list of those wishing to share a ride.

 

Return to Index

Area Information

The Florida Keys and Key West
Title/Logo
Click for Duck Key, Florida Forecast

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Related Links

International Whitefly Studies Network
International Whitefly
Study Network


3rd European Whitefly Symposium


PapersInvited presents an exhaustive list of Calls for Papers issued by professional bodies, journal editors and other conference organizers in all disciplines.

 

Return to Index

For More Information

UF/IFAS Organizers

 

Philip A. Stansly, Ph.D.

Professor of Entomology

University of Florida

Southwest Florida Research and Education Center

2686 State Road 29 North

Immokalee FL 34142

PHONE: 239-658-3400 ext. 3427
FAX: 239-658-3469

EMAIL: pstansly@ufl.edu

Ms. Beth Miller-Tipton - Conference Coordinator
University of Florida/IFAS
Office of Conferences and Institutes (OCI)
Building 639, Mowry Road
PO Box 110750
Gainesville, FL 32611-0750
PHONE: 352-392-5930
FAX: 352-392-9734
EMAIL: bmt@ufl.edu

USDA/ARS Organizers

 

Cindy McKenzie, Ph.D.

USDA, ARS,

US Horticultural Research Laboratory

2001 South Rock Road

Fort Pierce, FL 34945

PHONE: 772-462-5917
FAX: 772-462-5986

EMAIL: cmckenzie@ushrl.ars.usda.gov

 

Robert G. Shatters, Jr., Ph.D. 
USDA, ARS

US Horticultural Research Laboratory
2001 South Rock Rd.
Fort Pierce, FL 34945
PHONE: 772-462-5912
FAX: 772-462-5986
EMAIL: rshatters@saa.ars.usda.gov

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